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Sweden to consider igaming advertising ban

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitter Email Address Subscribe to the iGaming newsletter Sweden to consider igaming advertising ban 24th April 2019 | By contenteditor Casino & games Topics: Casino & games Legal & compliance Marketing & affiliates Sports betting Tags: Mobile Online Gambling A new investigation into gambling advertising in Sweden will consider a number of new controls to halt what lawmakers consider to be overly aggressive marketing practices by the country’s licensed igaming operators, including a blanket ban on advertising.The investigation will be handled by the Gaming Market Commission (Spelmarknadsutredningen). The commission was set up in 2018 to assess the impact of regulatory expansion on the Swedish horse racing and sports industries, and to explore measures to reduce the harmful effects of gambling.The Spelmarknadsutredningen has now been tasked with developing additional measures to limit gambling advertising in the country, and asked to deliver a report on the matter by October 1, 2020.It has been asked to consider a number of options, including whether special category-specific controls should be introduced, similar to those in place for alcohol advertising.It will also look at whether certain elements promoted in advertising, such as bonuses, jackpots and free spins, should be limited, and whether additional information about gambling, such as the probability of winning, should be given more prominence.In addition the Spelmarknadsutredningen will look at stricter controls, such as limiting gambling advertising during sporting broadcasts, special restrictions for games where there is a greater risk of players developing problem gambling habits. It has also been asked to assess the consequences of a partial or total ban on gambling advertising.The move comes amid increasing concern about “excessive” advertising by operators in the market, with Minister for Civil Affairs Ardalan Shekarabi first warning licensees of the need to roll back marketing in February this year. He called on operators to set out a strategy for ensuring they advertised responsibly by the end of March.In March the country’s gambling regulator Spelinspektionen then set out plans to crack down on excessive advertising. This was followed by a new industry code of conduct, set out by operator associations Spelbranschens Riksförbund (SPER) and Branschföreningen för Onlinespel (BOS).
“The measures the industry presented to me contained good parts, but were far from sufficient to deal with the situation,” Shekarabi said earlier today (March 24), however.“Now the government is taking further action to stop the aggressive gambling advertising,” he said. “It is about protecting Sweden’s consumers.”Svenska Spel, which competes against private operators via its Svenska Spel Sport & Casino subsidiary, has already decided to stop advertising its online casino offering for the rest of 2019.The Spelmarknadsutredningen is a 19-member commission, led by special investigator Anna-Lena Sörenson, a former Member of Parliament.Sweden’s newly-regulated market generated turnover of SEK3.29bn (£271.3m/€313.8m/$352.8m) in the first quarter of 2019. Former horse race betting monopoly AB Trav och Galopp (ATG) leads the market with turnover of SEK1.07bn, with Svenska Spel Sport & Casino accounting for SEK577m of the total. Private operators’ turnover amounted to SEK1.64bn. A new investigation into gambling advertising in Sweden will consider a number of new controls to halt what lawmakers consider to be overly aggressive marketing practices by the country’s licensed igaming operators, including a blanket ban on advertising. Regions: Europe Nordics Swedenlast_img read more

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Coronation Insurance Plc (WAPIC.ng) 2020 Abridged Report

first_imgCoronation Insurance Plc (WAPIC.ng) listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchange under the Insurance sector has released it’s 2020 abridged results.For more information about Coronation Insurance Plc (WAPIC.ng) reports, abridged reports, interim earnings results and earnings presentations, visit the Coronation Insurance Plc (WAPIC.ng) company page on AfricanFinancials.Document: Coronation Insurance Plc (WAPIC.ng)  2020 abridged results.Company ProfileCoronation Insurance Plc is an insurance company in Nigeria licensed to underwrite all classes of life and non-life insurance for the personal, groups, commercial and industrial sectors. The company has operations in Nigeria and Ghana. General and personal insurance products cover motor, life, investment, yacht, marine and home insurance. Corporate insurance products cover general property insurance, automotive, marine, aviation, all risk, fire and special perils, goods-in-transit and guarantee and liability insurance for the oil and gas, hotel and restaurant, professional firms and associations, manufacturing, education, energy, telecommunication, financial services, trading, religious bodies, contractors, travel agent, real estate and transport sectors. Public sector clients include government ministries and departments, parastatals and agencies. Wapic Insurance Plc was founded in 1958. Its company head office is in Lagos, Nigeria. Coronation Insurance Plc is listed on the Nigerian Stock Exchangelast_img read more

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Holy Land groups pave path to peace with commonality and…

first_img linda gaither says: Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] It may be a cliché to say that water knows no boundaries, but for Elizabeth Koch-Ya’ari, navigating the stream of ecology and peacemaking is bringing together Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian environmentalists – people of different faiths from neighboring communities – to mobilize and build friendships around their common source of life.As a project coordinator with EcoPeace Middle East, Koch-Ya’ari leads a campaign to rehabilitate the Jordan River. Once a vital source of clean water throughout the Holy Land, the river has been sullied by untreated sewage and drought during the past 50 years.EcoPeace Middle East gathers Israelis, Jordanians and Palestinians in the lower Jordan River for the “Big Jump,” an event to raise awareness of river restoration efforts. Photo: EcoPeace Middle East“We come together and we use environment as a platform for peace-building,” Koch-Ya’ari told Episcopal News Service following a presentation in Tel Aviv in January, when she met with a United States interfaith delegation that visited the region on pilgrimage.“It’s an amazing opportunity to enter into understanding these different communities that are bordering each other, that share the same water resources, that share the environment,” she said. “In this area of the world, water can bring us together, because water does not see all these walls and borders that we put between each other.”The Jordan River has major significance in Judaism, Christianity and Islam as the site where the Israelites crossed into the Promised Land, where John the Baptist baptized Jesus, and where Prophet Mohammed foretold an event that happened years later.EcoPeace has created a toolkit of resources for Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities, called Water and Ecology in the Jordan River, to encourage faith-based education and engagement around the issue of water.“The reality is that many people who live along the Jordan River don’t experience its benefits. In many parts of its flow, it’s dirty, polluted, [and] it disappears in dry seasons of the year,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, one of the pilgrimage co-leaders, told ENS while visiting the Yardenit Baptismal Site along the Jordan River in the Galilee region of northern Israel.“The work of the EcoPeace institute is to gather people from both sides of the river, from different faith traditions in neighboring communities, to advocate and work for improvement of the water situation, to understand each other’s needs, and they come to understand each other as friends in doing that work,” she said. “It’s true peace-building work.”The Rev. John Kitagawa, rector of St. Philip’s in-the-Hills Episcopal Church in Tucson, Arizona, and a pilgrimage member, said the disappearance of the Jordan River would be tragic. Not only does it mean so much to the lives of people on both sides of the Jordan River, he said, but “it is deeply important to our faith. It’s not possible to read the Scriptures without all kinds of references to the Jordan River.”Kitagawa said there are lots of parallels in the United States where water issues abound.“I live in the desert in southern Arizona. Our groundwater is basically depleted. We have to import water from the Colorado River, and so the very substance of life is at stake,” he said. “But it’s not just those of us who are desert-dwellers. We are increasingly seeing people who are dealing with fracking issues in their area and how that affects groundwater. Coal mining and other forms of mining have deep issues with polluting water and farmers are increasingly facing drought issues with global warming. Water is a constant issue around us. We have very much in common, and we just need to figure out how to understand our common roots, and one of those common roots is our responsibility as stewards of God’s creation.”“Communities across this region share so much,” Koch-Ya’ari said of the Holy Land. “Water is a basic part of life and to join together to rehabilitate shared water streams like the lower Jordan River, we gain a lot, not only for the environment but also to learn about each other, about our different faith communities and about how we can help each other [and] our shared ecosystems.”Koch-Ya’ari is one of a number of leaders of grassroots initiatives in the Holy Land with whom the U.S. interfaith delegation met during its Jan. 18-27 pilgrimage.She and other grassroots leaders are certain that these sorts of initiatives will be the key to building the trust and breaking down the barriers that will ensure a lasting peace in the region long after the politicians broker any kind of deal. However, prospects for the resumption of negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians appear complicated at best after a year that has seen the collapse of peace talks brokered by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, a devastating war between Israel and the Palestinian movement Hamas in the Gaza Strip, and a series of actions and statements by Israeli and Palestinian leaders that both reflect and contribute to a divisive climate.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whose Likud Party emerged as the winner of Tuesday’s parliamentary elections, provided the latest example of politically charged rhetoric this week, stating the day before the election that there would be no Palestinian state under his leadership.  Netanyahu previously has consistently endorsed a two-state solution, including in the context of negotiations with the Palestinians. It is unclear what the prime minister’s statement this week, in the context of a divisive and surprisingly close election, might mean for the future of the peace process or Netanyahu’s own relationship with key international supporters of a two-state solution, including the United States government.Lior Frankiensztajn of the Shades Negotiation Program talks to members of the U.S. interfaith pilgrimage that visited the Holy Land in January. Photo: Matthew Davies/ENSBack in January, the interfaith group heard how Lior Frankiensztajn’s world changed a few years ago after he welcomed a Palestinian man into his home for two months. He got to learn many things about himself and his roots, but most importantly, he saw “how reality looks from a different perspective,” he told the interfaith pilgrims following lunch in a Tel Aviv restaurant. Unfortunately, “politicians manage the relationships, which limits the opportunity for progress. … There has to be a different approach to policymaking, to education.”It was this thinking that led Frankiensztajn to launch the Shades Negotiation Program, which creates opportunities for Palestinian and Israeli decision-makers, politicians, educators and other leaders to meet and engage with their counterparts. The program is sponsored by Harvard University and partly funded by the U.S. State Department.Acknowledging that it is easy to engage the converted, Frankiensztajn said that Shades is trying to identify the obstacles, areas that need more attention in helping people “to become better negotiators, better communicators through this experience [and] really getting to understand the nuances and the culture of the other side.” Creating trust, he added, is a critical part of the peace process.Azhar Azeez, president of the Islamic Society of North America and a pilgrimage member, responded to Frankiensztajn’s presentation with encouragement and congratulations for his peace-making efforts. “I can see how this endeavor will bring positive change and hope,” he said.The 15-member interfaith pilgrimage was co-led by Jefferts Schori; Rabbi Steve Gutow, president of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs; and Sayyid Syeed, national director of interfaith and community alliances for the Islamic Society of North America.The visit was planned in response to Resolution B019, passed by The Episcopal Church’s General Convention in 2012, that called for positive investment and engagement in the region and recommended that the presiding bishop develop an interfaith model pilgrimage with multiple narratives. That resolution reiterated The Episcopal Church’s longstanding commitment to a negotiated two-state solution “in which a secure and universally recognized state of Israel lives alongside a free, viable and secure state for the Palestinian people.”“Only when people on the ground speak up and say ‘enough is enough’ will the possibility of peace and justice break through in the problematic relationship between the Palestinians and Israelis,” said Gutow. “When we meet with groups like Shades, Roots, and EcoPeace, we know that the journey to resolution and reconciliation is not only possible but eminently doable.”Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger greet one another as members of the interfaith pilgrimage arrive at Gush Etzion to learn about the work of Roots. Photo: Matthew Davies/ENSThe group Roots brings together Israeli settlers in Gush Etzion with Palestinians from adjoining villages to promote dialogue and build trust as a path to peace. The leadership of Roots believe it is imperative for the communities to put aside political retrenchment, divisive actions and rhetoric in order to begin sowing the seeds necessary to make an eventual peace agreement take hold.Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger told the interfaith leaders that Roots has transformed the way he views the world.One year ago, at the invitation of a friend, Schlesinger left his home and walked just 20 minutes through the Arab fields and vineyards and arrived at the piece of land where the interfaith pilgrims were now gathered to listen to his story. He said his heart was pounding as he entered the compound where approximately 25 Jews and 25 Palestinians were talking.Schlesinger, now a Roots project coordinator, had grown up with fear of the Palestinians who lived alongside his village.“We have no connections with the other side. Newspapers are different, radio stations are different, houses of worship are different, we buy in different stores, we have different school systems. We have no contact at all. We pass one another on the roads and don’t know who’s driving the car,” he said. “When you have that situation of distance, you have fear and you have suspicion and you have hate.”But through the conversations he had during that gathering one year ago, he came to understand that the Palestinians who’d been his neighbors all those years also lived in fear of him. “I’ve never thought of it like that before. We’re afraid of each other,” he said. For the first time in his life, Schlesinger said, he was talking to “the other” as an equal.From left, Roots project coordinators Ali Abu Awwad, Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger and Shaul Judelman listen to responses from members of the U.S. interfaith pilgrimage who visited Gush Etzion in January. Photo: Matthew Davies/ENSPalestinian Ali Abu Awwad, a co-founder of Roots, was at that gathering and shared his life story with the group. “It was the first time in my life that I heard life from a Palestinian perspective, and he spoke without rancor, without hate, and we spoke about his life,” Schlesinger said. “It was really difficult to hear and it felt like I was being personally attacked to hear a narrative that is so different from mine. But as different as it was from my narrative, it wasn’t false. I didn’t hear any lies. I heard that he was taking the building blocks of history and of life as I know them and putting them together into a completely different story, but his story made sense. And now I see myself in Ali’s story. And although he didn’t say it, in his story I saw myself as the oppressor. It began a process of rethinking.”Awwad, who was raised in a highly political family and served time as a political prisoner, said there are many conflict designers on both sides and that “we are good in this competition of who suffers more. … But when it comes to solutions, we lose the courage, because we act like victims. Victims will never be able to solve their own conflict if they are the prisoners of their pain. … The price of this war has become easier than the price of peace. We need to find a way where people can serve God and not lose their humanity. We can make a difference together.”Shaul Judelman, a Roots project coordinator who has lived in Gush Etzion for the past 13 years, said: “We know that there is great disagreement over many issues – over the facts of the past and even about the reality of the present – but we believe that effective dialogue is the secure place for argument and deeper understanding. It is in this space that solutions can be built.”Gutow said that Roots “teaches us … about traditional politicians oppressing the intrinsic dreams of the real people who live on the land.“We must stand with those who can both understand and speak with integrity about the differing narratives of the regular people who make their homes there,” Gutow added. “We must provide them with the platforms and the financial support and the validation they need to succeed. The job of our pilgrimage is to serve as an interfaith witness to the truths of both sides and to help the good and kind people who dwell there find the peace and wholeness and calm they so desire and so deserve.”Reflecting on the pilgrimage, Jefferts Schori told Episcopal News Service that “the kinds of grassroots peace-making efforts we witnessed in the Land of the Holy One are all focused on building relationships. [Yet] the sad reality is that Palestinians and Israelis live almost completely separate lives. Most never meet at grocery stores, schools, or in civic life. … That human encounter is essential to humanizing ‘the other.’ The Abrahamic faith traditions speak of encountering the image of God, the divine creative capacity that is part of our nature.”She said she was encouraged by “the willingness to cross boundaries, physical divisions, as well as suspicion, doubt, and fear” and described it as “the soil in which peace can begin to grow, … Getting one’s hands dirty together creates bonds that are deeper than our conscious prejudices. Bonds born of shared labor will endure, and they invite others to come and see, to be a bit vulnerable, in order to see the healing that might be possible.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. March 20, 2015 at 8:54 am Approximately one-third of the US foreign foreign aid budget goes to Israel, a highly developed industrialized country. In 2014 the US gave $3.6 billion dollars in military aid to Israel. That is over $4 million per hour every hour of the day. Benjamin Netanyahu knows that no matter what he says or does it will not jeopardize that support. American political leaders, especially those of the majority Republican party, have no will to use that potential leverage to push him toward seriously pursuing a two-state solution. As a result, American taxpayer dollars continue to support an apartheid state whose leaders have no intention of changing the situation. March 18, 2015 at 7:50 pm “The inequitable division of water under the Oslo II Agreement means that Israelis were allocated four times more water than Palestinians from the shared Mountain Aquifer. This unequal access to water leaves Israeli farms in [illegal] settlements well-irrigated while Palestinian farmers and communities are largely dependent on purchasing expensive water tanked in by Israeli companies.”Made in Israel, Agricultural Exports from Occupied Territories, WHO PROFITS: The Israeli Occupation Industry, April 2014 page 9 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 18, 2015 Rev. Vicki Gray says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC John D. Andrews says: Newland Smith says: Rector Belleville, IL Tags March 19, 2015 at 1:43 pm 972mag.com/photos-israeli-army-arrests-7-in-action-against-e1-settlement/104606/Palestinian, international and Israeli activists protested against Israeli plans to seize and build in the E1 area, which would cut off the northern and southern parts of the West Bank. Held on the same day as Israeli elections, the protest was aimed at attracting international attention to the progress of illegal Israeli construction and the planed displacement over 15,000 Palestinians and Bedouin communities living in 45 communities in the area. March 18, 2015 at 10:09 pm What I think is missing in these initiatives is the lack of any acknowledgement of the structural power imbalance. From a posting from Richard Falk:“The idea of balance and symmetry should also ‘see’ the structures of life that describe the contrasting conditions of the two peoples. Israelis living in conditions of near-normalcy, Palestinians enduring, for an incredible six-decade period, a variety of daily hardships and abuses that is cumulatively experienced as acute human insecurity. To be structurally blindfolded and blind is to adopt a common yet deforming appearance of balance that perpetuates an injust imbalance between oppressor and oppressed.” (Richard Falk. “On (In)Balance and Credibility in America : Israel-Palestine.” In: Palestine : the Legitimacy of Hope. Just World Books, 2014 : 167) Rector Shreveport, LA linda gaither says: March 19, 2015 at 9:33 am It is true that the Israeli government under Netanyahu has not wanted a two-state solution as previously shown by their walking out of negotiations for frivolous reasons, and now, Netanyahu stating it clearly in order to get votes from the Israeli far right. It is important to note that Netanyahu won re-election by a vote of the people. Therefore, it only makes sense to work to change the minds of the Israeli citizens to become more compassionate toward the Palestinians. As minds are changed, there is the potential for Israelis to elect leaders that see Palestinians and Muslims as their brothers and sister. Only then will we be able to see a change in Israeli policies that treat all human beings as children of God. Muslim, Jewish, and Christian leaders are well-suited to lead initiatives to bring this to reality. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 March 18, 2015 at 6:03 pm What a farce, what an insult, printing this mere hours after Mr. Netanyahu’s statements renouncing the two-state solution, promising more settlements, and denigrating Palestinian voters in the one state of Israel he’s now nakedly intent on expanding to the Jordan. What world does 815 live in? Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls March 19, 2015 at 9:32 am Although one Palestinian is mentioned and quoted in this article, it cannot escape notice that the focal point of the meetings was Israeli Jewish and the conversations reported were in a Tel Aviv restaurant, in an illegal settlement and at the river that Israel controls utterly and West Bank Palestinian Christians cannot reach. One also notices that the Prime Minister’s statements were shrugged off as “politically charged rhetoric” and not as the tragic truth that has been dissembled all these years. The future is not the least bit unclear; it is and has been clear for decades. The vision on this pilgrimmage appears to have been as murky as the Jordan. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ linda gaither says: linda gaither says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listingcenter_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA MARY MORRIS says: Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 31, 2015 at 5:05 pm It’s time for the national church to divest from Israel. We all also need to raise up the plight of our co-religionists in Palestine. I can’t tell you how many people I talk to who are surprised to hear that some Palestinians are Christian. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 18, 2015 at 9:16 pm It is time for all of us to say, “Enough is enough.” The election in Israel finally has shown us the truth about Mr. Netanyahu’s peace negotiations for the last 19 years, as we now hear that there will be no Palestinian State, nor was any Palestinian State ever desired. Netanyahu has negotiated in bad faith. Just taking the issue of water where the illegal settlements enjoy such amenities as swimming pools and water features while yards away in Palestinian Villages the water is turned off for days, even months, where it is illegal to dig a cistern and where most wells have been demolished. This is a land where one group of people is sub-human, and another group of people is privileged. We must say ENOUGH! This apartheid state can no longer continue. We must step up and do what we can to assure freedom and equality for all, not just those who are Jewish. We must support our Moslem and Christian brothers and sisters who struggle for justice. Thankfully many, many Jewish voices are now being heard through Jewish Voice for Peace and they are getting louder. We must listen to this voice and ask how together we can tell the world that Enough is Enough!! Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (10) Environment & Climate Change, Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET March 20, 2015 at 3:43 pm Washington (CNN: )House Speaker John Boehner will travel to Jerusalem sometime in the next two weeks to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a top Israeli government official told CNN Friday. Boehner spokesman Kevin Smith confirmed the visit, which will take place during the Easter recess and marks Boehner’s first trip to the nation since becoming Speaker. His last visit was in 2008.“The Speaker will visit Israel during the next district work period. He looks forward to visiting the country, discussing our shared priorities for peace and security in the region, and further strengthening the bond between the United States and Israel,” Smith said. According to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, the speaker’s trip will begin March 31, and he’ll be leading a congressional delegation of Republican lawmakers.It’s the latest move by the House Speaker that’s sure to amplify a growing partisan divide over Israel, as the show of support from Republicans comes just as President Barack Obama and U.S. allies are negotiating an agreement with Iran to avoid a war. Holy Land groups pave path to peace with commonality and trust J Harry Gunkel says: Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Middle East Israel-Palestine, liz oliver says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

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Central New York priest under investigation for alleged financial misconduct

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Central New York priest under investigation for alleged financial misconduct Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Egan MillardPosted Nov 5, 2019 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC [Episcopal News Service] An upstate New York priest accused of financial misconduct is now being investigated by law enforcement, according to the Diocese of Central New York, which announced on Oct. 31 that it had turned over the results of its own investigation to police.The Rev. Joell Szachara. Photo: Diocese of Central New YorkThe Rev. Joell Szachara had been serving as the rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in New Hartford, New York, but resigned at the direction of Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe, the diocese said in late September. At that time, Duncan-Probe placed Szachara on administrative leave, restricting her from engaging in ministry, while a forensic audit was conducted on the finances of St. Stephen’s.With the audit complete, the diocese – which did not specify the type of financial wrongdoing Szachara has been accused of – referred the case to law enforcement as it continues its own investigation through the Title IV disciplinary process, Duncan-Probe wrote in an Oct. 31 letter to the clergy and wardens of her diocese.“In this diocese, we have a shared commitment to transparency and accountability, acting in ways that honor the sacred trust of being a community of faith,” Duncan-Probe wrote. “While there may be times when that trust is betrayed, together we will do the hard work of holding one another accountable, repenting, and seeking forgiveness, praying to ‘live lives worthy of our calling.’”Szachara, who served St. Stephen’s for over a decade, has held several prominent positions in her diocese and The Episcopal Church. She was a deputy at three General Conventions and served on various General Convention committees, in addition to the board of the Diocese of Central New York and several diocesan committees.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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Apsara Houses / Beast Estudio Creativo

first_imgArchDaily Photographs Save this picture!© Gerardo Rosel+ 22Curated by Clara Ott Share Area:  180 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project CopyHousing•Tulum, Mexico Projects “COPY” Year:  Manufacturers: A1+Muvieri, Archicad, Chukum, Concepto 61 Apsara Houses / Beast Estudio CreativoSave this projectSaveApsara Houses / Beast Estudio Creativo ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/945693/apsara-houses-beast-estudio-creativo Clipboard Apsara Houses / Beast Estudio Creativo Lead Architects: Architects: Beast Estudio Creativo Area Area of this architecture project Housing Jaime Aramburu Fernández Mexico “COPY” Photographs:  Gerardo Rosel Manufacturers Brands with products used in this architecture project Engineering:CREARECity:TulumCountry:MexicoMore SpecsLess SpecsSave this picture!© Gerardo RoselRecommended ProductsPorcelain StonewareCeramiche KeopeCeramic Tiles – BackPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – BuildWoodGustafsWood Veneered Wall & Ceiling PanelsDoorsStudcoAccess Panels – AccessDorText description provided by the architects. Apsara is a group of three houses located in Holistika, a community focused on respect for nature.Save this picture!First Floor PlanSave this picture!© Gerardo RoselSave this picture!Second Floor PlanSave this picture!© Gerardo RoselAchieving the integration with the natural landscape lies the objective of this project. Each one consists of a room, a full bathroom, a living room, a kitchen with a terrace and a rooftop with a jacuzzi.Save this picture!© Gerardo RoselThe placement is carried out in order to save all the existing trees on the property, minimizing the environmental impact and creating spaces that respect and integrate with the context. In this way it achieves a natural and random composition between the three modules without losing privacy and providing views and ventilation for all spaces.Save this picture!© Gerardo RoselSave this picture!SectionSave this picture!© Gerardo RoselThe pool, which functions as a water mirror and a refreshing element, connects the three houses and creates a common space and public space.Save this picture!© Gerardo RoselSave this picture!© Gerardo RoselUnder the shade of the trees and following the shapes, angles and breaks that they mark, this project is landed creating a fresh space under the intense sun of Tulum.Save this picture!© Gerardo RoselThe material in walls, ceilings and floors stands out for its warm and neutral color. Chukum, typical of the region, is used for its waterproofing properties and minimizes cracking. Its versatility allows it to be used both indoors and outdoors and together with wood and stone finishes.Save this picture!© Gerardo RoselProject gallerySee allShow lessThe Rise of Co-living Under the Influence of Urbanization in ChinaArticlesMissouri State University Ozark Education Center / BNIMSelected ProjectsProject locationAddress:Tulum, Q.R., MexicoLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/945693/apsara-houses-beast-estudio-creativo Clipboard 2019 CopyAbout this officeBeast Estudio CreativoOfficeFollowProductConcrete#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingTulumOn FacebookMexicoPublished on August 17, 2020Cite: “Apsara Houses / Beast Estudio Creativo” [Conjunto de viviendas Apsara / Beast Estudio Creativo] 17 Aug 2020. ArchDaily. Accessed 10 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogAluminium CompositesTechnowoodHow to Design a Façade with AluProfile Vertical ProfilesGlassMitrexSolar GreenhouseMetal PanelsAurubisOxidized Copper: Nordic BrownDoorsEGGERWood Laminate Doors in Molecular Plant Science InstituteStonesCosentinoSurfaces – Silestone® Nebula SeriesWall / Ceiling LightsLouis PoulsenLamp – LP RiplsWood Boards / HPL PanelsBruagRoom Dividers – Partition Wall MDFStonesNeolithSintered Stone – Mar del PlataWindowspanoramah!®ah! SecurityPanels / Prefabricated AssembliesULMA Architectural SolutionsMIS Facade PanelCarpetsFabromont AGTextile Floor Covering – Orbital® 07 COLORpunkt®LightsNorka lightingLuminaire – BelfastMore products »Save想阅读文章的中文版本吗?图鲁姆仙女座之家,以泳池连接公共空间 / Beast Estudio Creativo是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my streamlast_img read more

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Big Lottery spells out future funding plans

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. The Big Lottery in Northern Ireland has unveiled the new focus for its grant programmes up to 2012 which will deliver £40 million for the voluntary and community sector.Last year the Big Lottery Fund carried out a consultation to find out how local communities wanted future grant programmes to be developed.The new grant themes include the impact of alcohol on people and communities, young people at risk, older people at risk, and improving communities by making better use of existing spaces. Advertisement  25 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Tagged with: Big Lottery Fund Funding Irelandcenter_img A series of events and meetings will take place across Northern Ireland between now and the end of November 2009 giving Northern Ireland communities the chance to have their say on the funding proposals.The Big Proposals for Northern Ireland gives details on how future grant could be developed in the following areas:· Alcohol Related Harm: A £5 million programme that will provide funding for up to four years for projects that reduce the harm to people, families and communities directly affected by alcohol misuse. It is likely that the programme will be open by Autumn 2010.· Young People at Risk: A £10 million programme providing funding for up to five years for activities that give young people opportunities to reconnect with school, society, employment, their families and their communities. It is likely that the programme will be open by Autumn 2010.· Older People at Risk: A £10 million programme providing funding for up to four years for activities giving older people the opportunity to live more independent lives and contribute to their community. It is likely that the programme will be open by Autumn 2010.· Space and Place: A £15 million programme providing funding to improve community relations by making better use of existing spaces and places where people live and creating safe places to play, to meet others and take part in activities such as sport, learning and health promotion. It is likely that the programme will be open by Autumn 2010.www.biglotteryfund.org.uk Howard Lake | 15 October 2009 | News Big Lottery spells out future funding planslast_img read more

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Tis the Season to Celebrate!

first_img More Cool Stuff 11 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Community News faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyCitizen Service CenterPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes First Heatwave Expected Next Week Top of the News Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Community News Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Herbeauty12 Female Fashion Trends That Guys Can’t StandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyWhy Luxury Fashion Brands Are So ExpensiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyA Dark Side Of Beauty Salons Not Many People Know AboutHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyStop Eating Read Meat (Before It’s Too Late)HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Reasons Why Selena Gomez Has Billions Of FansHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Reasons Why The Lost Kilos Are Regained AgainHerbeautyHerbeauty Make a commentcenter_img Front Row L-R: Margaret Caldwell, Tracy Tobias, Amanda Baughman, Ashley Barrett, Jana DeGange, Jina Khachik, Carol Van Citters. Back Row L-R: Jana Van Dyck, Nanette Brown, Charlotte Miller, Meg Wade, Angela Shepherd-Isagholian, Anne Bierling, Katie Enney, Jan Roberts, Hillary Clayburgh, Katrina Harbers, Fiama Traxler, Maggie Mason, Maria Strong, Paige Thatcher, and Nicole Ravana. Photo credit: Margaret Caldwell).In the holiday spirit of mixing business with pleasure, the LCPC Parent Education board, ministry support team, and staff met at the La Canada home of Ashley Barrett on December 12, 2016 for a year end Christmas Party and joint board/staff meeting. The evening was filled with good food, fellowship, reflection, planning, and prayer in anticipation of the wonderful year ahead. In attendance were Ashley Barrett, Amanda Baughman, Anne Bierling, Nanette Brown, Margaret Caldwell, Hillary Clayburgh, Jana De Gange, Katie Enney, Heather Ehrhart, Lynne Graves, Katrina Harbers, Jina Khachik, Maggie Mason, Charlotte Miller, Nicole Ravana, Jan Roberts, Angela Shepherd-Isagholian, Ashley Smith, Maria Strong, Paige Thatcher, Tracy Tobias, Fiama Traxler, Carol Van Citters, Jana Van Dyck, and Meg Wade.Second Semester for LCPC Parent Education’s 15 classes for parents of children 0-18 begins the week of January 10th. In addition to the classes already in session, we are excited to introduce our New Babies class. The New Babies class (for babies born 8/1/2016 – 12/31/2016) will begin the week of Wednesday January 25th from 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. and will be taught by experienced teacher and mother of seven, Nanette Brown. January 17 – 27 is Open House. We invite all parents of children ages infant to 18 to experience a free trial class.To sign up for a class, learn more, or experience a Free LCPC class, go to www.lacanadapc.org/parented or call (818) 790-6708 ext. 205. Classes meet weekly September through May and attract approximately 400 participants from 20 different cities. La Canada Presbyterian Church is located at 626 Foothill in La Canada. Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Business News Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Faith & Religion News Tis the Season to Celebrate! By KATIE ENNEY Published on Thursday, December 29, 2016 | 11:20 am Subscribe Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday last_img read more

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Expansion overview given at town hall

first_img WhatsApp Local News WhatsApp Twitter By Digital AIM Web Support – February 24, 2021 Pinterest TAGS  Ector County Utility District President Tommy Ervin answers questions after a town hall held Thursday at Buddy West Elementary School. Infrastructure expansion dominated discussion during a town hall meeting that sought to bring Ector County Utility District officials and customers on the same page, but many attendees left discontent with the information they received.Engineering and finance consultants who work with the utility district used the majority of the meeting Thursday to clarify the factors that are driving board members to take action, what projects are needed to relieve system deficiencies and how ECUD plans to finance development in West Odessa.The utility district was established in 1976 and has had an ongoing history of low water pressure concerns.Ector County Utility District President Tommy Ervin said board members realized in 2013 that the water system could not keep up with the population growth occurring in the district.The Texas Commission on Environmental Quality requires public water systems to maintain a set of minimum operating practices, including maintaining a normal operating pressure of 35 pounds per square inch throughout the system.Ervin said acting now is important because the utility district is on the edge of that minimum requirement with some areas experiencing water pressure as low as 38 psi.ECUD took steps to find viable options that would enhance their system’s operation and developed a master water plan that is expected to meet current and future customer needs for the next 25 years.The master water plan was drafted and designed by the Fort Worth engineering firm Kimley-Horn.“The biggest thing for me was to ensure the system was compliant with state standards,” John Atkins of Kimley-Horn said. “What we’ve tried to do is minimize the amount of infrastructure that ECUD would have to pay for to get this system compliant with TCEQ.”Residents who attended the town hall were taken on a virtual tour of West Odessa to see exactly where proposed improvements and pipelines would be located. The digital rendering showed two water towers added on Knox Avenue and Tripp Avenue, toward the Interstate Highway 20 border of the utility district, and a pump station located on 42nd Street.Chris Ekrut of NewGen Strategies & Solutions presented information that detailed the financial commitments ECUD would have to make in order to execute the master water plan.The district has applied for a $45.7 million loan from the Texas Water Development Board, which provides water planning resources and loans to local governments for water supply and quality projects. Through the Drinking Water State Revolving Fund loan program, ECUD is eligible to use the agency’s loan funding to upgrade their water infrastructure.Ekrut said the advantage of this form of funding is that ECUD receives a lower interest rate than if they borrowed the money from another source. He said the estimated savings to the district total about $13 million over the 30-year life of the loan.As of last month, the loan application was administratively complete by ECUD and is undergoing review by TWDB staff. Final approval on the loan is not expected until November or later.“The board is looking through all of this documentation, they’re looking through all the records of the district, they’re sending people out to talk to district personnel and what they’re trying to gauge and measure is the financial, managerial and technical capability of the district to take on this project,” Ekrut said.The process is like qualifying for a mortgage when buying a house.“They’re going to compare (your income) to what you’re trying to borrow and make sure that you have enough money and that you have the capability to pay back the debt,” Ekrut said.He said water rate increases placed on customers in February have been necessary to demonstrate that the district can generate enough revenue to repay the loan.“If we cannot get funding from the board, that doesn’t absolve you or the district from doing this project,” Ekrut told the audience. “The project still has to happen because the state says these are the requirements and you have to meet those. “If we can’t get funding from the board, we’ve got to look elsewhere and that drives the interest rates up and that drives the cost up.”Robert Chacon, a West Odessa resident, said there should be exemptions for senior citizens on fixed incomes and those that use less water.“I’m using 10 gallons of water a month to water a couple of trees on an empty lot,” Chacon said. “I used to pay $27 and now I’m paying $77. It just doesn’t seem fair.”The utility district provided handouts for seniors at the town hall that listed local programs that provide assistance with utility payments.Jeannie Blankinship is another county resident whose question for board members centered on what they are doing to communicate with customers.Blankinship said grassroots efforts should not be the main way residents receive information and emphasized the district’s need for a website to consistently relay messages to customers.“You can’t leave your communication part out, that’s where everything crumbles,” Blankinship said.Several other residents after the presentation said they remained unconvinced that the infrastructure improvements were even necessary.center_img Pinterest Previous articleBBB celebrates National Small Business WeekHeather Massey is the regional director of the Permian Basin Better Business Bureau.Next articleKhudobin helps Stars end 6-game skid in 3-0 win vs. Panthers Digital AIM Web Support Expansion overview given at town hall Facebook Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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Climate change and Southern Ocean ecosystems I: How changes in physical habitats directly affect marine biota

first_imgAntarctic and Southern Ocean (ASO) marine ecosystems have been changing for at least the last 30 years, including in response to increasing ocean temperatures and changes in the extent and seasonality of sea-ice; the magnitude and direction of these changes differ between regions around Antarctica that could see populations of the same species changing differently in different regions. This paper reviews current and expected changes in ASO physical habitats in response to climate change. It then reviews how these changes may impact the autecology of marine biota of this polar region: microbes, zooplankton, salps, Antarctic krill, fish, cephalopods, marine mammals, seabirds, and benthos. The general prognosis for ASO marine habitats is for an overall warming and freshening, strengthening of westerly winds, with a potential pole-ward movement of those winds and the frontal systems, and an increase in ocean eddy activity. Many habitat parameters will have regionally specific changes, particularly relating to sea-ice characteristics and seasonal dynamics. Lower trophic levels are expected to move south as the ocean conditions in which they are currently found move pole-ward. For Antarctic krill and finfish, the latitudinal breadth of their range will depend on their tolerance of warming oceans and changes to productivity. Ocean acidification is a concern not only for calcifying organisms, but also for crustaceans such as Antarctic krill; it is also likely to be the most important change in benthic habitats over the coming century. For marine mammals and birds, the expected changes primarily relate to their flexibility in moving to alternative locations for food and the energetic cost of longer or more complex foraging trips for those that are bound to breeding colonies. Few species are sufficiently well studied to make comprehensive species-specific vulnerability assessments possible. Priorities for future work are discussed.last_img read more