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PENNSYLVANIA: Flooded neighbors not forgotten

first_img Rector Hopkinsville, KY Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Albany, NY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit an Event Listing Submit a Press Release Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest [Diocese of Bethlehem] The Diocese of Bethlehem has received a grant from Episcopal Relief & Development to implement a plan intended to help residents of West Pittston still recovering from last September’s flooding while also preparing Episcopal churches in the region to respond to future disasters. The grant comes in addition to other assistance and resources. The announcement was made May 31 by Bishop Paul V. Marshall.This partnership with Episcopal Relief & Development, combined with funds provided by the diocese – 68 churches in 14 eastern and northeastern Pennsylvania counties – will assist the recovery of the West Pittston area and the establishment of a regional disaster recovery and outreach center owned by the diocese and run through a coordinated effort among the Luzerne County regional parishes. The center will be located in St. George’s Episcopal Church in Nanticoke and is planned to include storage and gathering space in addition to the worship area.The diocesan community is also adopting a parish preparedness initiative. Using resources and training provided by Episcopal Relief & Development, each parish in the diocese will establish individualized plans to protect their resources and resume services as quickly as possible during a disaster, while also responding to the needs of their parishioners and the community at large.After the September flood, Trinity Episcopal Church of West Pittston took the initiative to assist their neighbors in every way they could.“Two months ago,” Marshall said, “Father John Major and Janine Ungvarsky hosted a clergy meeting to review the progress in ministry to flood victims along the Susquehanna, particularly in the West Pittston area. Clergy from Tunkhannock to Honesdale and points north and south of that Route 6 line were present. There were several joy-producing moments even in the recollection of devastation. In the first place, Trinity and its friends have been persevering, long-term servants of their neighbors, and have found that to be transformative of their life. Secondly, the good people at Episcopal Relief & Development have been nothing but helpful in their conversations. I left the event heartened by the clergy turnout, the persistence of Trinity’s priest and people, and the knowledge that Episcopal Relief & Development knows that we are here and are trying. I want to publicly thank all of them.”Although it has been eight months since the combined effects of Hurricane Irene and Tropical Storm Lee caused the Susquehanna River to overflow into a number of small Northeastern Pennsylvania towns in September 2011, many residents continue to struggle to rebuild and recover. Water levels from this flood exceeded all previous crests and inundated areas that were never considered part of the flood plain. As a result, many residents of this area were not required to have flood insurance, and the few hundred who had insurance did not have adequate coverage to cope with the unprecedented extent of the devastation. This left many residents without sufficient funds to renovate their homes.First-response agencies provided critical assistance immediately after the flood, but longer-term efforts are being led by local organizations with direct ties to impacted communities. Episcopal Relief & Development and the Episcopal Diocese of Bethlehem have partnered in a multi-faceted effort to provide continued relief for those impacted by the September flooding, and enhance preparations for future disasters.Several areas of the diocese were affected by the flooding. Among the hardest hit communities was West Pittston, along with nearby towns of Duryea, Harding, Port Blanchard and Plains. A combined total of more than 1,500 homes and businesses in this area were flooded, many sustaining first and second floor damage. Dozens of structures, including two entire mobile home parks, had to be razed as a result of the flood waters, and many renters were permanently displaced from these communities.While Trinity Church West Pittston was spared by one block, more than a third of that town was not so lucky. When Trinity representatives reported on the devastation faced by their neighbors, the people and parishes of the Diocese of Bethlehem under the leadership of Marshall responded by donating thousands of dollars in store gift cards, cash and other items that volunteers from Trinity and their community distributed to those affected by the flooding. The bishop made an immediate grant to get relief efforts moving.In the midst of these local recovery efforts, the diocese welcomed Deacon Elaine Clements of the Diocese of Louisiana, a member of Episcopal Relief & Development’s Partners in Response team, on a visit to West Pittston and the surrounding towns. Partners in Response is a group of clergy and lay people from around the country with experience in disaster response, who assist impacted dioceses and congregations in caring for themselves and discerning their role in disaster recovery. Clements offered insight and advice for all facets of disaster response and recovery, from ways to coordinate outreach efforts to how to protect clergy and volunteers from the stress of dealing with a prolonged recovery process.“My real role was simply to let the congregation and leadership hear themselves as they brainstormed and created a long range program plan out of what had been their initial and immediate actions to help a community in need,” said Clements.The Rev. John Major, rector at Trinity West Pittston and interim Diocese of Bethlehem representative to Episcopal Relief & Development said Clements was a valuable and very welcome resource at a critical point in the parish’s response efforts.“Deacon Elaine reassured us that our plan to start small and be there for our neighbors for the long haul was the way to go, and pointed us towards the many resources available to us, such as those offered by Episcopal Relief & Development,” Major said. “It’s comforting to know we can rely on her guidance and support as we go forward with a recovery process that experts tell us could take three years or more.”With the encouragement and guidance of Episcopal Relief & Development and its Partners in Response, the Diocese of Bethlehem reached out to Moravian and Lutheran ecumenical partners, and will use funding pooled from local and grant sources  ( $72,796  from Episcopal Relief & Development) to coordinate renovations to some of the neediest and most devastated homes. Episcopal Relief & Development also supported and encouraged a plan put forth by Trinity and the diocese to use a deconsecrated church in an area outside the flood plain as a regional disaster response and outreach center. This church building, which is centrally located to the 10 active churches in flood-prone Luzerne County, will be repurposed to serve as a collection and distribution site for disaster supplies and outreach, reestablishing the Episcopal presence in this community in a very meaningful way.In addition to preparing the Luzerne County region to better respond to the needs of its community through this new regional outreach center, the Diocese of Bethlehem is also adopting Episcopal Relief & Development’s parish preparedness initiative. Using resources and training provided by Episcopal Relief & Development, the parishes of the diocese will establish individualized plans to protect their resources and resume services as quickly as possible during a disaster, while also responding to the needs of their parishioners and the community at large. A permanent fund has been created to enable instantaneous response to future disasters.“I’ve seen firsthand how important a preparedness plan is, and how unprepared we really are,” Major said. “Getting 68 parishes ready to respond to a range of different disasters could be a real challenge, but I’m very impressed by the wealth of resources we have available from Episcopal Relief & Development and the enthusiasm of their staff to help us with the task.”The Diocese of Bethlehem will soon welcome a return visit by members from Episcopal Relief & Development’s Partners in Response team. They will help Major and a recently formed diocesan Disaster Recovery and Community Resiliency team to assess their efforts to date, and provide recommendations and guidance as the Diocese moves forward with the outreach center, ecumenical renovation projects and the preparedness initiative. Rector Knoxville, TN Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK PENNSYLVANIA: Flooded neighbors not forgotten Grant to assist diocese to build on initiative of local parish Rector Smithfield, NC Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Submit a Job Listing Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Bath, NC Rector Collierville, TN center_img Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Shreveport, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Martinsville, VA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Belleville, IL Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Featured Events Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Posted Jun 4, 2012 Rector Washington, DC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Rector Columbus, GA Curate Diocese of Nebraska TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Pittsburgh, PA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Service Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OHlast_img read more

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Program Budget and Finance issues statement on working budget

first_imgProgram Budget and Finance issues statement on working budget Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel General Convention 2012, Program Budget & Finance General Convention, Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following statement has been issued by the members of the Episcopal Church Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance, meeting on July 4 at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church.At its first working meeting on July 4, the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance decided to utilize the Five Marks of Mission budget proposal here or http://www.episcopalchurch.org/sites/default/files/pbf_budget_template_5_marks_of_mission.pdf as its working template for the 2013-15 triennial budget. Program, Budget and Finance made that decision without commitment to any of the specific line items within the Five Marks of Mission proposal.Program, Budget and Finance made its decision because the Five Marks of Mission budget provides a clear missionary framework for budgeting and is based on updated information regarding income.  Program, Budget and Finance will continue its work of building and amending income and expense lines for the final budget presentation on Tuesday, July 10.Diane Pollard, Diocese of New York, Chair of Program, Budget and Finance, and Bishop Steven Lane, Diocese of Maine, Vice chair, on behalf of the members of Program, Budget and Finance.July 4, 2012 Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Jul 4, 2012 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

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Cynthia Kittredge begins as dean of Seminary of the Southwest

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Rector Martinsville, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Posted Jun 13, 2013 Featured Jobs & Calls Featured Events Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit a Job Listing Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Albany, NY Rector Shreveport, LA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Bath, NC [Seminary of the Southwest press release] Cynthia Briggs Kittredge, who has served as professor of New Testament since she joined the faculty in 1999 and as academic dean since 2010, began her tenure as dean and president of Seminary of the Southwest on June 1, 2013.The Rt. Rev. Dena Harrison, chair of the board and bishop suffragan of the Diocese of Texas, announced the board’s appointment of Dr. Kittredge in March when Douglas Travis made known his plans to retire after leading the seminary since 2007. “On behalf of the board of trustees, it is my great joy to announce the Rev. Dr. Kittredge’s appointment as our eighth dean and president. She is the perfect person to lead the seminary at this time, and we are extraordinarily blessed to have her gifts and talents devoted to our institution and its faithful service to the church,” said Bishop Harrison.Martha J. Horne, dean and president emerita of Virginia Theological Seminary, will preach at Dr. Kittredge’s installation onFriday, September 13 in Austin. Horne was the first woman appointed president of an Episcopal seminary, and Kittredge is the third. Katherine Hancock Ragsdale is president and dean of Episcopal Divinity School, which she has led since 2009.Dr. Kittredge holds degrees from Williams College and Harvard Divinity School where she earned a Th.D. in 1996. She was ordained priest in 1985 and is canonically resident in the Diocese of Texas. She has served as assisting clergy at Episcopal Church of the Good Shepherd since 1999.Dr. Kittredge’s research has centered on early Christian communities, Paul’s letters, the Fourth gospel, and hermeneutics. She has published Community and Authority: The Rhetoric of Obedience in the Pauline Tradition and Conversations with Scripture: The Gospel of John and co-edited Walk in the Ways of Wisdom: Essays in Honor of Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza and The Bible in the Public Square. She contributed “Biblical Studies for Ministry: Critical and Faithful Interpretation of Scripture in an Either/Or World” in Transforming Graduate Biblical Education: Ethos and Discipline, Kent Richards and Elisabeth Schüssler Fiorenza, eds., Society of Biblical Literature.Dean Kittredge served on the Theological Education in the Anglican Communion Steering Committee from 2009 – 2012. She was elected president of the Anglican Association of Biblical Scholars in 2008 and has served on the board of Evangelical Education Society since 2005 and now chairs the board.Dr. Kittredge and her husband Frank D. Kittredge, Jr. live in Austin and have three grown children. Rector Smithfield, NC Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Hopkinsville, KY Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Tampa, FL Submit an Event Listing Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Youth Minister Lorton, VA Cynthia Kittredge begins as dean of Seminary of the Southwest Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Submit a Press Release Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Theological Education Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Tags Curate Diocese of Nebraska Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Rector Columbus, GA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group People, Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 last_img read more

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Holy Land groups pave path to peace with commonality and…

first_img linda gaither says: Submit a Press Release AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis [Episcopal News Service] It may be a cliché to say that water knows no boundaries, but for Elizabeth Koch-Ya’ari, navigating the stream of ecology and peacemaking is bringing together Israeli, Palestinian and Jordanian environmentalists – people of different faiths from neighboring communities – to mobilize and build friendships around their common source of life.As a project coordinator with EcoPeace Middle East, Koch-Ya’ari leads a campaign to rehabilitate the Jordan River. Once a vital source of clean water throughout the Holy Land, the river has been sullied by untreated sewage and drought during the past 50 years.EcoPeace Middle East gathers Israelis, Jordanians and Palestinians in the lower Jordan River for the “Big Jump,” an event to raise awareness of river restoration efforts. Photo: EcoPeace Middle East“We come together and we use environment as a platform for peace-building,” Koch-Ya’ari told Episcopal News Service following a presentation in Tel Aviv in January, when she met with a United States interfaith delegation that visited the region on pilgrimage.“It’s an amazing opportunity to enter into understanding these different communities that are bordering each other, that share the same water resources, that share the environment,” she said. “In this area of the world, water can bring us together, because water does not see all these walls and borders that we put between each other.”The Jordan River has major significance in Judaism, Christianity and Islam as the site where the Israelites crossed into the Promised Land, where John the Baptist baptized Jesus, and where Prophet Mohammed foretold an event that happened years later.EcoPeace has created a toolkit of resources for Jewish, Christian and Muslim communities, called Water and Ecology in the Jordan River, to encourage faith-based education and engagement around the issue of water.“The reality is that many people who live along the Jordan River don’t experience its benefits. In many parts of its flow, it’s dirty, polluted, [and] it disappears in dry seasons of the year,” Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori, one of the pilgrimage co-leaders, told ENS while visiting the Yardenit Baptismal Site along the Jordan River in the Galilee region of northern Israel.“The work of the EcoPeace institute is to gather people from both sides of the river, from different faith traditions in neighboring communities, to advocate and work for improvement of the water situation, to understand each other’s needs, and they come to understand each other as friends in doing that work,” she said. “It’s true peace-building work.”The Rev. John Kitagawa, rector of St. Philip’s in-the-Hills Episcopal Church in Tucson, Arizona, and a pilgrimage member, said the disappearance of the Jordan River would be tragic. Not only does it mean so much to the lives of people on both sides of the Jordan River, he said, but “it is deeply important to our faith. It’s not possible to read the Scriptures without all kinds of references to the Jordan River.”Kitagawa said there are lots of parallels in the United States where water issues abound.“I live in the desert in southern Arizona. Our groundwater is basically depleted. We have to import water from the Colorado River, and so the very substance of life is at stake,” he said. “But it’s not just those of us who are desert-dwellers. We are increasingly seeing people who are dealing with fracking issues in their area and how that affects groundwater. Coal mining and other forms of mining have deep issues with polluting water and farmers are increasingly facing drought issues with global warming. Water is a constant issue around us. We have very much in common, and we just need to figure out how to understand our common roots, and one of those common roots is our responsibility as stewards of God’s creation.”“Communities across this region share so much,” Koch-Ya’ari said of the Holy Land. “Water is a basic part of life and to join together to rehabilitate shared water streams like the lower Jordan River, we gain a lot, not only for the environment but also to learn about each other, about our different faith communities and about how we can help each other [and] our shared ecosystems.”Koch-Ya’ari is one of a number of leaders of grassroots initiatives in the Holy Land with whom the U.S. interfaith delegation met during its Jan. 18-27 pilgrimage.She and other grassroots leaders are certain that these sorts of initiatives will be the key to building the trust and breaking down the barriers that will ensure a lasting peace in the region long after the politicians broker any kind of deal. However, prospects for the resumption of negotiations between Israelis and Palestinians appear complicated at best after a year that has seen the collapse of peace talks brokered by U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry, a devastating war between Israel and the Palestinian movement Hamas in the Gaza Strip, and a series of actions and statements by Israeli and Palestinian leaders that both reflect and contribute to a divisive climate.Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, whose Likud Party emerged as the winner of Tuesday’s parliamentary elections, provided the latest example of politically charged rhetoric this week, stating the day before the election that there would be no Palestinian state under his leadership.  Netanyahu previously has consistently endorsed a two-state solution, including in the context of negotiations with the Palestinians. It is unclear what the prime minister’s statement this week, in the context of a divisive and surprisingly close election, might mean for the future of the peace process or Netanyahu’s own relationship with key international supporters of a two-state solution, including the United States government.Lior Frankiensztajn of the Shades Negotiation Program talks to members of the U.S. interfaith pilgrimage that visited the Holy Land in January. Photo: Matthew Davies/ENSBack in January, the interfaith group heard how Lior Frankiensztajn’s world changed a few years ago after he welcomed a Palestinian man into his home for two months. He got to learn many things about himself and his roots, but most importantly, he saw “how reality looks from a different perspective,” he told the interfaith pilgrims following lunch in a Tel Aviv restaurant. Unfortunately, “politicians manage the relationships, which limits the opportunity for progress. … There has to be a different approach to policymaking, to education.”It was this thinking that led Frankiensztajn to launch the Shades Negotiation Program, which creates opportunities for Palestinian and Israeli decision-makers, politicians, educators and other leaders to meet and engage with their counterparts. The program is sponsored by Harvard University and partly funded by the U.S. State Department.Acknowledging that it is easy to engage the converted, Frankiensztajn said that Shades is trying to identify the obstacles, areas that need more attention in helping people “to become better negotiators, better communicators through this experience [and] really getting to understand the nuances and the culture of the other side.” Creating trust, he added, is a critical part of the peace process.Azhar Azeez, president of the Islamic Society of North America and a pilgrimage member, responded to Frankiensztajn’s presentation with encouragement and congratulations for his peace-making efforts. “I can see how this endeavor will bring positive change and hope,” he said.The 15-member interfaith pilgrimage was co-led by Jefferts Schori; Rabbi Steve Gutow, president of the Jewish Council for Public Affairs; and Sayyid Syeed, national director of interfaith and community alliances for the Islamic Society of North America.The visit was planned in response to Resolution B019, passed by The Episcopal Church’s General Convention in 2012, that called for positive investment and engagement in the region and recommended that the presiding bishop develop an interfaith model pilgrimage with multiple narratives. That resolution reiterated The Episcopal Church’s longstanding commitment to a negotiated two-state solution “in which a secure and universally recognized state of Israel lives alongside a free, viable and secure state for the Palestinian people.”“Only when people on the ground speak up and say ‘enough is enough’ will the possibility of peace and justice break through in the problematic relationship between the Palestinians and Israelis,” said Gutow. “When we meet with groups like Shades, Roots, and EcoPeace, we know that the journey to resolution and reconciliation is not only possible but eminently doable.”Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Katharine Jefferts Schori and Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger greet one another as members of the interfaith pilgrimage arrive at Gush Etzion to learn about the work of Roots. Photo: Matthew Davies/ENSThe group Roots brings together Israeli settlers in Gush Etzion with Palestinians from adjoining villages to promote dialogue and build trust as a path to peace. The leadership of Roots believe it is imperative for the communities to put aside political retrenchment, divisive actions and rhetoric in order to begin sowing the seeds necessary to make an eventual peace agreement take hold.Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger told the interfaith leaders that Roots has transformed the way he views the world.One year ago, at the invitation of a friend, Schlesinger left his home and walked just 20 minutes through the Arab fields and vineyards and arrived at the piece of land where the interfaith pilgrims were now gathered to listen to his story. He said his heart was pounding as he entered the compound where approximately 25 Jews and 25 Palestinians were talking.Schlesinger, now a Roots project coordinator, had grown up with fear of the Palestinians who lived alongside his village.“We have no connections with the other side. Newspapers are different, radio stations are different, houses of worship are different, we buy in different stores, we have different school systems. We have no contact at all. We pass one another on the roads and don’t know who’s driving the car,” he said. “When you have that situation of distance, you have fear and you have suspicion and you have hate.”But through the conversations he had during that gathering one year ago, he came to understand that the Palestinians who’d been his neighbors all those years also lived in fear of him. “I’ve never thought of it like that before. We’re afraid of each other,” he said. For the first time in his life, Schlesinger said, he was talking to “the other” as an equal.From left, Roots project coordinators Ali Abu Awwad, Rabbi Hanan Schlesinger and Shaul Judelman listen to responses from members of the U.S. interfaith pilgrimage who visited Gush Etzion in January. Photo: Matthew Davies/ENSPalestinian Ali Abu Awwad, a co-founder of Roots, was at that gathering and shared his life story with the group. “It was the first time in my life that I heard life from a Palestinian perspective, and he spoke without rancor, without hate, and we spoke about his life,” Schlesinger said. “It was really difficult to hear and it felt like I was being personally attacked to hear a narrative that is so different from mine. But as different as it was from my narrative, it wasn’t false. I didn’t hear any lies. I heard that he was taking the building blocks of history and of life as I know them and putting them together into a completely different story, but his story made sense. And now I see myself in Ali’s story. And although he didn’t say it, in his story I saw myself as the oppressor. It began a process of rethinking.”Awwad, who was raised in a highly political family and served time as a political prisoner, said there are many conflict designers on both sides and that “we are good in this competition of who suffers more. … But when it comes to solutions, we lose the courage, because we act like victims. Victims will never be able to solve their own conflict if they are the prisoners of their pain. … The price of this war has become easier than the price of peace. We need to find a way where people can serve God and not lose their humanity. We can make a difference together.”Shaul Judelman, a Roots project coordinator who has lived in Gush Etzion for the past 13 years, said: “We know that there is great disagreement over many issues – over the facts of the past and even about the reality of the present – but we believe that effective dialogue is the secure place for argument and deeper understanding. It is in this space that solutions can be built.”Gutow said that Roots “teaches us … about traditional politicians oppressing the intrinsic dreams of the real people who live on the land.“We must stand with those who can both understand and speak with integrity about the differing narratives of the regular people who make their homes there,” Gutow added. “We must provide them with the platforms and the financial support and the validation they need to succeed. The job of our pilgrimage is to serve as an interfaith witness to the truths of both sides and to help the good and kind people who dwell there find the peace and wholeness and calm they so desire and so deserve.”Reflecting on the pilgrimage, Jefferts Schori told Episcopal News Service that “the kinds of grassroots peace-making efforts we witnessed in the Land of the Holy One are all focused on building relationships. [Yet] the sad reality is that Palestinians and Israelis live almost completely separate lives. Most never meet at grocery stores, schools, or in civic life. … That human encounter is essential to humanizing ‘the other.’ The Abrahamic faith traditions speak of encountering the image of God, the divine creative capacity that is part of our nature.”She said she was encouraged by “the willingness to cross boundaries, physical divisions, as well as suspicion, doubt, and fear” and described it as “the soil in which peace can begin to grow, … Getting one’s hands dirty together creates bonds that are deeper than our conscious prejudices. Bonds born of shared labor will endure, and they invite others to come and see, to be a bit vulnerable, in order to see the healing that might be possible.”— Matthew Davies is an editor/reporter for the Episcopal News Service. March 20, 2015 at 8:54 am Approximately one-third of the US foreign foreign aid budget goes to Israel, a highly developed industrialized country. In 2014 the US gave $3.6 billion dollars in military aid to Israel. That is over $4 million per hour every hour of the day. Benjamin Netanyahu knows that no matter what he says or does it will not jeopardize that support. American political leaders, especially those of the majority Republican party, have no will to use that potential leverage to push him toward seriously pursuing a two-state solution. As a result, American taxpayer dollars continue to support an apartheid state whose leaders have no intention of changing the situation. March 18, 2015 at 7:50 pm “The inequitable division of water under the Oslo II Agreement means that Israelis were allocated four times more water than Palestinians from the shared Mountain Aquifer. This unequal access to water leaves Israeli farms in [illegal] settlements well-irrigated while Palestinian farmers and communities are largely dependent on purchasing expensive water tanked in by Israeli companies.”Made in Israel, Agricultural Exports from Occupied Territories, WHO PROFITS: The Israeli Occupation Industry, April 2014 page 9 An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud: Crossing continents and cultures with the most beautiful instrument you’ve never heard Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 Advocacy Peace & Justice, Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA By Matthew DaviesPosted Mar 18, 2015 Rev. Vicki Gray says: Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC John D. Andrews says: Newland Smith says: Rector Belleville, IL Tags March 19, 2015 at 1:43 pm 972mag.com/photos-israeli-army-arrests-7-in-action-against-e1-settlement/104606/Palestinian, international and Israeli activists protested against Israeli plans to seize and build in the E1 area, which would cut off the northern and southern parts of the West Bank. Held on the same day as Israeli elections, the protest was aimed at attracting international attention to the progress of illegal Israeli construction and the planed displacement over 15,000 Palestinians and Bedouin communities living in 45 communities in the area. March 18, 2015 at 10:09 pm What I think is missing in these initiatives is the lack of any acknowledgement of the structural power imbalance. From a posting from Richard Falk:“The idea of balance and symmetry should also ‘see’ the structures of life that describe the contrasting conditions of the two peoples. Israelis living in conditions of near-normalcy, Palestinians enduring, for an incredible six-decade period, a variety of daily hardships and abuses that is cumulatively experienced as acute human insecurity. To be structurally blindfolded and blind is to adopt a common yet deforming appearance of balance that perpetuates an injust imbalance between oppressor and oppressed.” (Richard Falk. “On (In)Balance and Credibility in America : Israel-Palestine.” In: Palestine : the Legitimacy of Hope. Just World Books, 2014 : 167) Rector Shreveport, LA linda gaither says: March 19, 2015 at 9:33 am It is true that the Israeli government under Netanyahu has not wanted a two-state solution as previously shown by their walking out of negotiations for frivolous reasons, and now, Netanyahu stating it clearly in order to get votes from the Israeli far right. It is important to note that Netanyahu won re-election by a vote of the people. Therefore, it only makes sense to work to change the minds of the Israeli citizens to become more compassionate toward the Palestinians. As minds are changed, there is the potential for Israelis to elect leaders that see Palestinians and Muslims as their brothers and sister. Only then will we be able to see a change in Israeli policies that treat all human beings as children of God. Muslim, Jewish, and Christian leaders are well-suited to lead initiatives to bring this to reality. In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 March 18, 2015 at 6:03 pm What a farce, what an insult, printing this mere hours after Mr. Netanyahu’s statements renouncing the two-state solution, promising more settlements, and denigrating Palestinian voters in the one state of Israel he’s now nakedly intent on expanding to the Jordan. What world does 815 live in? Comments are closed. Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Tampa, FL Featured Jobs & Calls March 19, 2015 at 9:32 am Although one Palestinian is mentioned and quoted in this article, it cannot escape notice that the focal point of the meetings was Israeli Jewish and the conversations reported were in a Tel Aviv restaurant, in an illegal settlement and at the river that Israel controls utterly and West Bank Palestinian Christians cannot reach. One also notices that the Prime Minister’s statements were shrugged off as “politically charged rhetoric” and not as the tragic truth that has been dissembled all these years. The future is not the least bit unclear; it is and has been clear for decades. The vision on this pilgrimmage appears to have been as murky as the Jordan. Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ linda gaither says: linda gaither says: Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Albany, NY This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listingcenter_img The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Youth Minister Lorton, VA MARY MORRIS says: Featured Events Rector Bath, NC Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR March 31, 2015 at 5:05 pm It’s time for the national church to divest from Israel. We all also need to raise up the plight of our co-religionists in Palestine. I can’t tell you how many people I talk to who are surprised to hear that some Palestinians are Christian. Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Rector Hopkinsville, KY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group March 18, 2015 at 9:16 pm It is time for all of us to say, “Enough is enough.” The election in Israel finally has shown us the truth about Mr. Netanyahu’s peace negotiations for the last 19 years, as we now hear that there will be no Palestinian State, nor was any Palestinian State ever desired. Netanyahu has negotiated in bad faith. Just taking the issue of water where the illegal settlements enjoy such amenities as swimming pools and water features while yards away in Palestinian Villages the water is turned off for days, even months, where it is illegal to dig a cistern and where most wells have been demolished. This is a land where one group of people is sub-human, and another group of people is privileged. We must say ENOUGH! This apartheid state can no longer continue. We must step up and do what we can to assure freedom and equality for all, not just those who are Jewish. We must support our Moslem and Christian brothers and sisters who struggle for justice. Thankfully many, many Jewish voices are now being heard through Jewish Voice for Peace and they are getting louder. We must listen to this voice and ask how together we can tell the world that Enough is Enough!! Submit a Job Listing An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Comments (10) Environment & Climate Change, Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Pittsburgh, PA Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Press Release Service Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector Columbus, GA Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET March 20, 2015 at 3:43 pm Washington (CNN: )House Speaker John Boehner will travel to Jerusalem sometime in the next two weeks to meet with Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, a top Israeli government official told CNN Friday. Boehner spokesman Kevin Smith confirmed the visit, which will take place during the Easter recess and marks Boehner’s first trip to the nation since becoming Speaker. His last visit was in 2008.“The Speaker will visit Israel during the next district work period. He looks forward to visiting the country, discussing our shared priorities for peace and security in the region, and further strengthening the bond between the United States and Israel,” Smith said. According to Israeli newspaper Haaretz, the speaker’s trip will begin March 31, and he’ll be leading a congressional delegation of Republican lawmakers.It’s the latest move by the House Speaker that’s sure to amplify a growing partisan divide over Israel, as the show of support from Republicans comes just as President Barack Obama and U.S. allies are negotiating an agreement with Iran to avoid a war. Holy Land groups pave path to peace with commonality and trust J Harry Gunkel says: Rector Collierville, TN Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Middle East Israel-Palestine, liz oliver says: Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraskalast_img read more

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Bishops, spouses learn firsthand about Flint’s water crisis

first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Environment & Climate Change, Rector Smithfield, NC New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Tags Rector Belleville, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Youth Minister Lorton, VA Submit a Press Release Rector Collierville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Bath, NC Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL center_img Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA House of Bishops, In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Flint Mayor Karen Weaver discusses the city’s water crisis during a Sept. 17 briefing at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church. Diocese of Eastern Michigan Bishop Todd Ousley, far right, and the Rev. Dan Scheid, St. Paul’s rector, organized the briefing as the first stop on a tour of Episcopal Church ministry sites in Flint for bishops, their spouses and others. Michigan Senate Minority Leader Jim Ananich (D-Flint), left, and Flint pediatrician Larry Reynolds, a member of the Flint Water Advisory Task Force, also participated. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Flint, Michigan] Even before the water crisis in Flint, Michigan, became a federal emergency in late January, the Episcopal Diocese of Eastern Michigan was distributing water and partnering with other churches and groups to respond to what Bishop Todd Ousley calls government’s “systematic, intentional neglect” of city residents.In Flint, as in many of the parts of Michigan suffering from the decline of the auto industry, “there is an ongoing, systematic ignoring of the plight of people in poverty and people of color,” Ousley told a group of bishops, their spouses and others who joined him on a Sept. 17 trip to Flint.Sixty percent of the city’s roughly 96,000 residents are African-American and 41.6 percent of Flint’s residents live below the poverty line, one of the highest poverty rates in the United States.The Episcopal Church in eastern Michigan recognized that it was called to respond to the human need in Flint and the response became evangelism by action, Ousley said. And Episcopalians responded “in relationship with the people who are telling us their concerns and what their needs are,” he said.The Sept. 17 trip was part of the House of Bishop’s Sept. 15-20 meeting underway in nearby Detroit.The water crisis has become a way for Eastern Michigan Episcopalians to “intentionally live into the Baptismal Covenant in a way that we had not been challenged to in the past,” Ousley said.The call to relieve Flint residents’ short-term needs, and to advocate for long-term solutions and systemic change, is what Ousley called a “clear intersection” of all of the Baptismal Covenant’s promises.“You couldn’t say this was just a justice issue or this is just a dignity issue; this is just a good news issue,” he said. “It was wrapped up in the entirety of the Baptismal Covenant.”The Rev. Dan Scheid, rector of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Flint, introduces Danielle Brown, executive director of Christ Enrichment Center, who spoke about how Flint needs people who are inspired to ministry and who are also knowledgeable or willing to learn about what the city needs. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceOr, in the words of Danielle Brown, executive director of Christ Enrichment Center, “You can’t throw away a whole city in my presence.”But “throwing away a city” is what Ousley said has been happening in Flint for decades.Michigan has long held a reputation for being a leader of the anti-slavery movement, and later for creating unprecedented upward economic mobility for African-Americans, said Ousley. “But it also has the history of being yet another one of the playing fields for white dominance and a reframing of slavery,” he said.Ousley argued that the post-World War II northern migration of African-Americans to Michigan ushered in an era when white autoworkers either moved up into the industry’s management ranks or left for jobs elsewhere.As the U.S. auto industry began its decades-long decline, Flint suffered economically and eventually lost more than half its residents.All the while, the need for a clean water supply in Flint was ignored for years, Ousley said, as General Motors pumped “billions upon billions of gallons of waste into the Flint River, which was the drinking supply for the city,” Ousley said. The river became so polluted that Flint officials began accessing Detroit’s water system. The price Detroit charged made Flint’s water rates the highest in the country, Ousley said.Ousley said he sees Flint’s story as partly one of environmental racism with “a long pattern of locating persons of color in areas where there was likely to be a high contamination in soil or in the waterways.”There are now acres of abandoned land in Flint were GM auto plants once stood and the GM Flint workforce has dropped from 80,000 to 5,000. As the tax base declined, city officials, and more recently, emergency managers appointed by the governor and with almost unlimited powers, began selling off municipal assets to pay the bills.“Everything had been stripped from us,” Mayor Karen Weaver told the group during a stop at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in downtown Flint.St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, which became a water distribution point, is an example of how those economic forces played out in people’s lives. General Motors was founded in Flint and only later moved southeast to Detroit. St. Paul’s was once know as “General Motors directors at prayer,” Ousley said.Now, the parish is a “shadow of what it once was” in terms of finances and members, but it has a rich legacy of endowments from those past members. Those endowments are contributing to its ministry to the Flint residents left behind.In April 2014, Flint’s emergency manager, in a money-saving measure, ordered the city’s water supply be switched from Detroit’s municipal water system temporarily to the Flint River until Flint could construct its own water pipeline from Lake Huron, the source of Detroit’s water. At the same time, the emergency manager, seeking to save $100 a day, the bishop said, ordered that the water not be treated with a chemical to prevent lead from leaching out of pipes into the water running through them. The state had, mistakenly, told Flint officials that federal guidelines did not require the chemical treatment, according to the New York Times.Then followed a series of falsified tests, ignored warnings and disregard of residents’ complaints of discolored and bad-smelling water, and skin rashes. In October 2014, General Motors switched the water supply for its remaining Flint operations to Lake Huron because Flint water was corroding metal parts in its factories.Long before state and local officials switched the city’s water back to the Detroit system and recanted their assurances about the safety of Flint’s water, churches and other community organizations went to work.“The grace of God just blew through this place” in the day after the extent of Flint’s water crisis became clear, said Craig Leavitt, a former General Motors metalworker and current St. Paul’s junior warden who runs Flint’s Downtown Crossover Outreach Ministry. Leavitt spoke at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, on the city’s east side to a group of bishops, their spouses and others on a tour of Episcopal Church ministry sites in Flint. Photo: Mary Frances Schjonberg/Episcopal News ServiceEpiscopal Relief & Development responded early on and was amazing, according to Craig Leavitt, a former GM metalworker and current St. Paul’s junior warden who runs Flint’s Downtown Crossover Outreach Ministry.“Almost before (Flint Mayor) Karen Weaver could open her mouth to say we have lead in our water, they were there,” he told the group during its stop at St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, on the city’s east side.Grants also came from the dioceses of Eastern and Western Michigan, and donations came from parishes across lower Michigan. St. Paul’s partnered with St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church and Christ Enrichment Center, along with other organizations, to give residents access to clean water. The outpouring of contributions was tremendous and Ousley said “we probably have enough bottled water to get us through decades.”Collaborations forged in those early days continue now with a focus on the ongoing needs for decades to come. Those needs include access to and education about so-called lead-mitigating foods, as well as spiritual and psychological counseling. Christ Enrichment Center, founded by nearby Episcopal congregations, is leading the way in meeting many of those needs with education and support.There is also the question of how Flint residents can afford the cost of replacing water pipes in their homes that have been irreversibly damaged by the corrosive water. Even residents who have the money to do so would be investing it in a house that is worth less than half of what it was in 2008, Ousley said.And there is another need, Weaver told the group at St. Paul’s: hope, visible signs of hope. The city has begun replacing damaged pipes in the municipal part of the water system and that work is offering a glimmer of that hope. Every home has been able to get a water filter but the filters are installed in kitchens, Weaver said, not in bathrooms and thus most people do no have filtered water for bathing. Homeless people still struggle to find clean water, she added.And there is still suspicion. Residents were told for months the water was fine; how do they believe those assurances now, asked Weaver.Meanwhile, the U.S. Senate last week took a small step towards helping Flint. On Sept. 15, in a 95-3 vote it approved the Water Resources Development Act that authorizes spending $270 million to aid Flint and other poor communities that have suffered from lead-contaminated water. It is a helpful sum Michigan Senate Minority Leader Jim Ananich (D-Flint) told the group, but it is still a “drop in the bucket” compared to what his city needs.However, the bill includes no immediate funding and, instead, approves projects for future federal spending from Congress’s appropriations committees. The House has not voted on the bill and its version does not include Flint, although supporters are trying to remedy that.It will take faith combined with expertise to face Flint’s future, said Brown, Christ Enrichment Center’s director, who told the group that she is not an Episcopalian but comes to her work with the fervor of an evangelist.“I am trained as a human services professional but I am also a saint of God” and she told them “if you have a passion for serving God’s people and know what to do, or have a desire to learn how or even to bring people in that know how, then collaboratively you can really see some splendid success within the ministry.”Ousley said that five years ago when Brown took over the center, its future was in doubt because of inept management, a lack of capacity to do the work expected and infighting among and within the Episcopal churches that sponsored the center. “But there was faithfulness,” he said, and Brown contributed “tremendous sacrifice and creativity” – and calm when the ceiling of her office collapsed on her. Reviving the center meant rethinking congregational and diocesan collaboration, Ousley said.The center’s growth in ministry is symbolic of the diocese’s response to Flint’s crisis for him.“I don’t give thanks for a water crisis, but the opportunity to be the church in the midst of that crisis has strengthened us as a church and as individual Christians,” he said.– The Rev. Mary Frances Schjonberg is an editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Knoxville, TN Bishops, spouses learn firsthand about Flint’s water crisis Ministry in the beleaguered city epitomizes baptismal promises Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Curate Diocese of Nebraska Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC House of Bishops Fall 2016 Advocacy Peace & Justice, The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group By Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Sep 19, 2016 Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Director of Music Morristown, NJlast_img read more

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Suite au changement de pouvoir présidentiel, les épiscopaliens se demandent…

first_img Tags Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Suite au changement de pouvoir présidentiel, les épiscopaliens se demandent comment ils doivent prier Faith & Politics Rector Pittsburgh, PA Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Submit an Event Listing Rector Albany, NY Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Rector Collierville, TN Press Release Service Featured Events Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Jobs & Calls Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Bath, NC An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Rector Tampa, FL Rector Martinsville, VA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Submit a Press Release de Mary Frances SchjonbergPosted Jan 23, 2017 Rector Smithfield, NC The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Associate Rector Columbus, GA Submit a Job Listing Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Washington, DC Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Belleville, IL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 [Episcopal News Service] Lorsque l’évêque Jeff Lee a écrit aux épiscopaliens du diocèse de Chicago après l’élection de novembre, il leur a demandé de prier pour Donald Trump ainsi que pour tous les élus et pour l’église.Un destinataire lui a demandé de cesser de dire aux gens d’admirer le président élu. Il ne s’agissait pas d’admiration mais seulement de prière, a-t-il répondu au destinataire. Il a cependant déclaré, lors de son interview avec Episcopal News Service, que la réaction de cette personne lui a donné une idée de l’intensité des réactions à l’élection de Donald Trump.Le dialogue entre Lee et un membre de son diocèse n’est pas un incident isolé. Depuis l’élection de Donald Trump en novembre, un grand nombre d’épiscopaliens ont demandé ce que signifie de prier pour le 45e président des États-Unis pendant un service religieux public, comment le faire et, pour certains, s’il convient même d’offrir de telles prières.Pour certains épiscopaliens, cela ne fait l’objet d’aucun débat : ils prieront pour Donald Trump qu’ils soient heureux ou pas de l’avoir comme président. Il est possible que certaines congrégations qui ont l’habitude de prier pour le président en citant son nom mettent fin à cette pratique mais pour d’autres, c’est un fait accompli qui continuera.Dans les médias sociaux et les débats au sein des congrégations, d’autres épiscopaliens font la distinction entre la prière pour la fonction présidentielle et celle pour la personne. Certains disent ne pas pouvoir tolérer que Donald Trump soit mentionné dans la liturgie car d’entendre son nom déclenche un traumatisme chez certains fidèles, eu égard aux commentaires sexuels, misogynes et racistes qu’il a émis et à son comportement général pendant et depuis la campagne. D’autres disent que l’on ne peut pas séparer la prière pour la fonction du titulaire de cette fonction ; ils savent qui exerce cette fonction qu’ils le désignent ou non par son nom.Article complet en anglais. Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector Knoxville, TNlast_img read more

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Cuba committee to hold hearing July 7 on new resolutions

first_img Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Western North Carolina Bishop José McLoughlin addresses the Episcopal Church in Cuba Committee during its July 6 afternoon session while New Jersey Bishop William “Chip” Stokes, co-chair of the committee, looks on. Photo: Lynette Wilson/Episcopal News Service[Episcopal News Service – Austin, Texas] It seems there is no mechanism for the Episcopal Church to admit an existing diocese into its structure without making a change to its constitution – a change that requires approval by two successive conventions.The 79th General Convention is underway at the Austin Convention Center and runs through July 13. The 80th General Convention will convene in 2021.The Episcopal Church in Cuba Committee spent two sessions July 6 deliberating the language of two new resolutions, A209, Reunification with the Episcopal Church of Cuba, and Resolution A214, which addresses the necessary constitutional and canonical changes. It will hold an open hearing on the two resolutions beginning at 7:30 a.m. on July 7 in the Hilton Austin Grand Ballroom K.“The first one, A209, expresses regret over the history that brought us to this place … and our strong desire for reunification,” said Becky Snow, who co-chairs the committee along with New Jersey Bishop William “Chip” Stokes.Cuba Bishop Griselda Delgado del Carpio listens as the Episcopal Church in Cuba Committee deliberates the second of two new resolutions on July 7. Photo: Lynette WilsonResolution A029 calls on General Convention to express its joy at the Episcopal Church of Cuba’s request to rejoin the Episcopal Church; lament the House of Bishops’ action in 1966 that split the two churches; note that the two churches “seek to employ God’s justice to confront our shared brokenness, and to equip and empower our efforts toward healing, wholeness and reconciliation for generations to come”; desire complete reunification; express deep regret that structural and constitutional issues prevent the realization of fullest expression of reunification at the 79th General Convention; and express the Episcopal Church’s eagerness “to share a future” with the Cuban Episcopal Church.To prepare for the admission of the Episcopal Church of Cuba, the committee drafted Resolution A214, which commends the church for meeting the actions proposed by the Task Force on Cuba, created by General Convention in 2015 to facilitate the reunification of the two churches.“We recognized that there needed to be a resolution that was not our resolution that went to Governance and Structure about necessary canonical changes, which they are working on to help not merely with Cuba, but in the event that a request like this should come again, we have something in place according to our Constitution and Canons,” Stokes told Episcopal News Service. He added that the notion of a diocese already established as an Anglican Communion province wasn’t foreseen.The constitutional change to accept a diocese outside the Episcopal Church’s structure and the canonical change necessary to accept a bishop elected, or in this case appointed, in another Anglican province didn’t present themselves until the committee began its deliberations.Resolution A214 expresses the 79th General Convention’s desire for an immediate reunification, recognizing, however, that the Episcopal Church “has yet to attend to the structural and canonical requirements necessary and pledges to complete the following actions to welcome” the Episcopal Church of Cuba as a diocese to the 80th General Convention.Full ENS coverage of the 79th meeting of General Convention is available here.Further, it calls for the necessary constitutional and canonical changes to name Cuba a diocese; it calls for the bishop of Cuba’s participation in the House of Bishops; the continued establishment of diocesan and congregational companion relationships; and $400,000 for support of the Cuban church’s ongoing mission and ministry. It also sets the Cuban clergy’s eligibility to participate in the International Clergy Pension Plan administered by the Church Pension Fund at the close of convention.When the relationship between the two churches ended, so did clergy pensions.“It’s been difficult for the Diocese of Cuba, and we certainly recognize the pain and strain of that,” said Stokes. “But we also believe that this will create permanent changes that, should anything like this happen in the future, we’re much more able to deal with it in a way that’s fair and treating others the same rather than just making things up as we go.”Finally, A214 calls for an interim body to accompany the two churches through their transition to re-unification and $50,000 to fund that work.During its July 4 open hearing, the committee formed four subcommittees to study a covenant committee, constitutional and canonical issues with reunification, pension and Resolution A052. While the committee held its July 4 hearing, a second resolution, D060, to establish a covenant with the Diocese of Cuba was filed. Later, the committee decided to strike the covenant language.The House of Bishops took its action in 1966 in response to the effects of the Cuban Revolution and the United States’ response. The Cuban Revolution, led by Fidel Castro, began in 1953 and lasted until President Fulgencio Batista was forced from power in 1959. Batista’s anti-communist, authoritarian government was replaced with a socialist state, which in 1965 aligned itself with the communist party.Formerly a missionary district, the Episcopal Church of Cuba is an autonomous diocese of the Anglican Communion under the authority of the Metropolitan Council of Cuba. The council is chaired by the primates of the Anglican churches of Canada, the West Indies and the Episcopal Church. The council has overseen the church in Cuba since it separated from the U.S.-based Episcopal Church in 1967.Prior to that time, in 1961, Episcopal schools in Cuba had been closed and appropriated, and many clergy and their families were displaced. Some remained in Cuba; some either returned or immigrated to the United States. Some clergy who remained in Cuba were imprisoned, executed, or disappeared. Church buildings were closed and left to deteriorate. The church was polarized politically, and its clergy and lay leaders suffered. But the church continued in the living rooms of the grandmothers, who held prayer services and Bible studies in their homes. Through them is transmitted a story of pain, and of faith.The Episcopal Church of Cuba traces its origins back to an Anglican presence beginning in 1871. Today, there are some 46 congregations and missions serving 10,000 members and the wider communities. During the 1960s, Castro’s government began cracking down on religion, jailing religious leaders and believers, and it wasn’t until Pope John Paul II’s 1998 visit to Cuba, the first ever visit by a Roman Catholic pope to the island, that the government began a move back toward tolerance of religion.— Lynette Wilson is a reporter and managing editor of Episcopal News Service. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Knoxville, TN General Convention, Rector Collierville, TN Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Latin America, General Convention 2018, Structure Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Featured Events Submit an Event Listing Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Music Morristown, NJ Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ center_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Submit a Press Release Rector Bath, NC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Hopkinsville, KY Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Shreveport, LA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Rector Albany, NY Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Martinsville, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books By Lynette WilsonPosted Jul 6, 2018 Submit a Job Listing Rector Washington, DC TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Cuba committee to hold hearing July 7 on new resolutions Required constitutional change will push reunification to 2021 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector and Chaplain Eugene, ORlast_img read more

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Rare 700-year-old Bible returns to Canterbury Cathedral, five centuries after…

first_imgRare 700-year-old Bible returns to Canterbury Cathedral, five centuries after it was removed Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Smithfield, NC Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Featured Events Tags Posted Aug 3, 2018 Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Shreveport, LA Rector Knoxville, TN Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Submit a Job Listing Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Anglican Communion Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH [Anglican Communion News Service] A rare medieval Bible has been returned to Canterbury Cathedral, the mother church of the worldwide Anglican Communion, some 500 years after it was removed. The Lyghfield Bible – named after the 16th-century monk who once owned it – was amongst a number of items removed from the cathedral’s monastic library at the time of the reformation. The monastic community at Canterbury was one of many which were dissolved on the orders of Henry VIII as he attempted to assert his authority over the newly independent church and plunder its assets.Read the entire article here. Associate Rector Columbus, GA Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Belleville, IL Course Director Jerusalem, Israel New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Tampa, FL Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector Albany, NY Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Bath, NC Rector Hopkinsville, KY Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate Diocese of Nebraska Press Release Service Rector Collierville, TN Submit an Event Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC Featured Jobs & Calls An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group last_img read more

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Central New York priest under investigation for alleged financial misconduct

first_img Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector Knoxville, TN Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Rector Martinsville, VA Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Press Release Service Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Tampa, FL Central New York priest under investigation for alleged financial misconduct Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR By Egan MillardPosted Nov 5, 2019 Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Rector Washington, DC The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Rector Belleville, IL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Submit a Press Release Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Smithfield, NC Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit an Event Listing Rector Bath, NC [Episcopal News Service] An upstate New York priest accused of financial misconduct is now being investigated by law enforcement, according to the Diocese of Central New York, which announced on Oct. 31 that it had turned over the results of its own investigation to police.The Rev. Joell Szachara. Photo: Diocese of Central New YorkThe Rev. Joell Szachara had been serving as the rector of St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church in New Hartford, New York, but resigned at the direction of Bishop DeDe Duncan-Probe, the diocese said in late September. At that time, Duncan-Probe placed Szachara on administrative leave, restricting her from engaging in ministry, while a forensic audit was conducted on the finances of St. Stephen’s.With the audit complete, the diocese – which did not specify the type of financial wrongdoing Szachara has been accused of – referred the case to law enforcement as it continues its own investigation through the Title IV disciplinary process, Duncan-Probe wrote in an Oct. 31 letter to the clergy and wardens of her diocese.“In this diocese, we have a shared commitment to transparency and accountability, acting in ways that honor the sacred trust of being a community of faith,” Duncan-Probe wrote. “While there may be times when that trust is betrayed, together we will do the hard work of holding one another accountable, repenting, and seeking forgiveness, praying to ‘live lives worthy of our calling.’”Szachara, who served St. Stephen’s for over a decade, has held several prominent positions in her diocese and The Episcopal Church. She was a deputy at three General Conventions and served on various General Convention committees, in addition to the board of the Diocese of Central New York and several diocesan committees.– Egan Millard is an assistant editor and reporter for the Episcopal News Service. He can be reached at [email protected] Director of Music Morristown, NJ Featured Events AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Curate Diocese of Nebraska Rector Shreveport, LA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Albany, NY Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Pittsburgh, PA Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Youth Minister Lorton, VA Associate Rector Columbus, GA Featured Jobs & Calls Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GAlast_img read more

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Presiding Bishop issues statement on coronavirus

first_img Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Featured Jobs & Calls TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Rector Belleville, IL Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI COVID-19, Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector Tampa, FL The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Featured Events In this time when we are all affected by the coronavirus, whether directly or indirectly, whether physically, biologically, psychologically, spiritually, and for many economically, it may be helpful to remember that we’re in this together.Jesus came among us in the first place, to show us the way to be right and reconcile with the God who is the creator of us all, and right and reconciled with each other as children of this one god who has created us all, and therefore as sisters, brothers, and siblings, one of another.Jesus came to show us how to be in a relationship with God and in relationship with each other, came to show us how to live not simply as collections of individual self-interest, but how to live as the human family of God. That’s why he said love the Lord your God, love your neighbor as yourself. Because in that is hope for all of us to be the human family of God.I was in Cuba the last few days with Bishop Griselda and the good people of the diocese there as we received and welcomed them as a full part of The Episcopal Church. A while back when she spoke to the last diocesan synod before they became part of The Episcopal Church, she said, and I quote, “The reason we must become part of The Episcopal Church is so that we can be part of a big family.” She spoke by prophecy. We are all part of a big family. Bigger than our biological families, bigger than our immediate families, bigger than our congregations, bigger than our dioceses, bigger than our cities, our states, our nation.We are part of the human family of God. Jesus came to show us that his way of love is the way of life. It’s God’s human family.We are in a time when remembering that may be important for all of us.We are in this together.What affects some directly affects all indirectly.We are part of a family. The human family of God.Just over the weekend the head of the World Health Organization, said this, and I quote, “We have seen this coming for years. Now is the time to act. This is not a drill. This epidemic can be pushed back, but only with collective, coordinated, and comprehensive approach by us all.”It takes us all. We are family.And then one of the spokespersons for the European Union, speaking to the member states said this, and I paraphrase: We must share our resources and our information. It is not the possession of any one nation.In each of those calls, and in the calls of many of our leaders, we have heard again and again, that we are in this together, we can walk through this together, and we will find our way in our life together.So look out for your neighbors, look out for each other. Look out for yourselves. Listen to those who have knowledge that can help to guide us medically and help to guide us socially. Do everything that we can to do this together, to respond to each other’s needs and to respond to our own needs.Walk together children, don’t get weary, because there’s a great camp meeting in the promised land.Allow me to close with this prayer found on the website of Episcopal Relief & Development, where there are resources and where information can be found.God of the present moment,God who in Jesus stills the stormand soothes the frantic heart;bring hope and courage to allwho wait or work in uncertainty.Bring hope that you will make them the equalof whatever lies ahead.Bring them courage to endure what cannot be avoided,for your will is health and wholeness;you are God, and we need you.This we pray in Christ our Lord. Amen.God love you. God bless you. May God hold us all in those almighty hands of love.Resources and information available here.[10 de marzo de 2020] El Obispo Presidente de la Iglesia Episcopal Michael Curry ha emitido la siguiente declaración.Mire el video del mensaje del Obispo Presidente aquí.En este momento, en el que todos estamos afectados por el coronavirus, ya sea directa o indirectamente, ya sea física, biológica, psicológica, espiritual y, para muchos, económicamente, puede ser útil recordar que estamos en esto juntos.Jesús vino a nosotros en primer lugar, para mostrarnos el camino para ser justos y reconciliarnos con el Dios que es el creador de todos nosotros, y justos y reconciliados entre nosotros como hijos de este único Dios que nos ha creado a todos, y por lo tanto como hermanas, hermanos, y familiares unos de otros.Jesús vino a mostrarnos cómo estar en una relación con Dios y con los demás, vino a mostrarnos cómo vivir no simplemente como colecciones de interés personal individual, sino cómo vivir como la familia humana de Dios. Por eso dijo ama al Señor tu Dios, ama a tu prójimo como a ti mismo. Porque en eso está la esperanza de que todos seamos la familia humana de Dios.Estuve en Cuba los últimos días con la obispa Griselda y con las buenas personas de la diócesis de allí cuando los recibimos y dimos la bienvenida como parte de la Iglesia Episcopal. Hace un tiempo, cuando ella habló en el último sínodo diocesano antes de que se convirtieran en parte de la Iglesia Episcopal, dijo, y cito: “La razón por la que debemos formar parte de la Iglesia Episcopal es para que podamos ser parte de una gran familia”. Ella profetizó. Todos somos parte de una gran familia. Más grande que nuestras familias biológicas, más grande que nuestras familias inmediatas, más grande que nuestras congregaciones, más grande que nuestras diócesis, más grande que nuestras ciudades, estados, y nación.Somos parte de la familia humana de Dios. Jesús vino a mostrarnos que su camino de amor es la forma de vida. Es la familia humana de Dios.Nos encontramos en un momento en el que recordar eso puede ser importante para todos nosotros.Estamos en esto juntos.Lo que afecta a algunos directamente afecta a todos indirectamente.Somos parte de una familia. La familia humana de Dios.Justo durante el fin de semana, el jefe de la Organización Mundial de la Salud dijo esto, y cito textualmente: “Hemos visto venir esto durante años. Ahora es el momento de actuar. Esto no es un ejercicio. Esta epidemia puede ser rechazada, pero sólo con un esfuerzo colectivo, coordinado y completo por todos nosotros”.Se nos requiere a todos. Somos familia.Y luego, uno de los portavoces de la Unión Europea, hablando con los Estados miembros, dijo esto, y parafraseo: debemos compartir nuestros recursos y nuestra información. No son posesión de ninguna nación.En cada una de esas llamadas, y en las llamadas de muchos de nuestros líderes, hemos escuchado una y otra vez, que estamos juntos en esto, podemos caminar juntos a través de esto, y encontraremos nuestro camino en nuestra vida juntos.Así que cuide a sus vecinos, cuide a los demás. Cuídense  ustedes mismos. Escuche a los que tienen conocimientos que puedan ayudarnos a guiarnos médicamente, y ayudarnos a guiarnos socialmente. Hagamos todo lo que podamos para lograr esto juntos, para responder a las necesidades de los demás y para responder a nuestras propias necesidades.Caminen juntos hijos, no se cansen, porque hay una gran reunión de campamento en la tierra prometida.Permítanme terminar con esta oración que se encuentra en el sitio web del Fondo Episcopal de Ayuda y Desarrollo, donde hay materiales y donde se puede encontrar información.Dios del momento presenteDios que en Jesús calma la tormentay alivia el corazón frenético;aporta esperanza y ánimo a todos losque esperan o trabajan en la incertidumbre.Aporta la esperanza de que los tratarás por igualen lo que se avecina.Dales ánimo para soportar lo que no se puede evitar,porque tu voluntad es salud y plenitud;eres Dios y te necesitamos.Esto rezamos en Cristo nuestro Señor. Amén.Que Dios les ame. Que Dios les bendiga. Que Dios les sostenga a todos en esas poderosas manos de amor. Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Pittsburgh, PA Director of Music Morristown, NJ Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Presiding Bishop issues statement on coronavirus An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Submit a Press Release Rector Hopkinsville, KY Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Presiding Bishop Michael Curry Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Washington, DC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Associate Rector Columbus, GA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector Albany, NY Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Bath, NC Tags [March 10, 2020] Episcopal Church Presiding Bishop Michael Curry has issued the following statement. Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit an Event Listing Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Martinsville, VA Submit a Job Listing Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Posted Mar 10, 2020 Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Press Release Service Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ 5:07 Health & Healthcare, Rector Collierville, TN Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Shreveport, LA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC last_img read more