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Rosa Parks and Mother Teresa: Justice vs. Charity

first_img Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY By Peter DreierPosted May 15, 2012 Rector Belleville, IL Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Comments (6) Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis September 6, 2013 at 6:36 pm Who wrote the following; Mother Theresa or Rosa Parks?O God, we pray for all those in our worldwho are suffering from injustice:For those who are discriminated againstbecause of their race, color or religion;For those imprisonedfor working for the relief of oppression;For those who are houndedfor speaking the inconvenient truth;For those tempted to violenceas a cry against overwhelming hardship;For those deprived of reasonable health and education;For those suffering from hunger and famine;For those too weak to help themselvesand who have no one else to help them;For the unemployed who cry outfor work but do not find it.We pray for anyone of our acquaintancewho is personally affected by injustice.Forgive us, Lord, if we unwittingly share in the conditionsor in a system that perpetuates injustice.Show us how we can serve your childrenand make your love practical by washing their feet.I’ll give you a hint – it wasn’t Rosa Parks. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Comments are closed. Freda Marie says: Rector Tampa, FL Teresa Gocha says: May 18, 2012 at 2:43 pm Mr Dreier says; “But even if Mother Teresa’s hospices, orphanages, and other institutions had been models of modern medicine and social work, the reality is that her approach to suffering was that of charity and pity.” I would like to know something of Mr Dreier’s approach to suffering that qualifies him to sit in judgement on Mother Teresa. I must have missed the publications describing his work (apart from writing, “research” and “thinking”) for justice and/or mercy. In the meantime, I thank God for the Mother Teresa’s of this world who are willing to do the best they can, and trust God to be in the gaps of their knowledge and ability. Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Curate Diocese of Nebraska Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT June 5, 2012 at 5:50 pm Thank you for explaining so clearly what I have felt for many years. I hope that others will learn from you the important contrast between these women. Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Shreveport, LA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET John Kirk says: Associate Rector Columbus, GA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Rector Washington, DC Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem June 13, 2012 at 8:25 pm I strongly disagree. I believe the author’s perspective on equality, human rights, and social justice requires broadening. As an African-American female priest, I believe that each woman, in her own unique way, contributed to work that equalized and justified the right to be a HUMAN BEING upon the earth! There are no “either/or’s” in the struggle for justice, equality, human rights and human dignity. There are only “both/and’s”. All issue forth from the mandate of Our Lord to LOVE. Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA center_img May 17, 2012 at 7:32 pm Seriously? Are you people for real? Mr. Dreier is absolutely correct; however, Mother Teresa is not in the same pantheon as the others. She is head and shoulders ABOVE them. Rector Hopkinsville, KY Featured Jobs & Calls Rector Smithfield, NC Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rosa Parks and Mother Teresa: Justice vs. Charity Angie Forde says: Neil Ewachiw says: Rector Bath, NC May 18, 2012 at 3:56 pm That this would be regarded as a noteworthy article by the Episcopal News Service encapsulates just how confused the Episcopal Church is about what constitutes the Gospel of Jesus Christ and the Millennium Development Goals. The writer accuses Blessed Teresa of Calcutta of mere charity and indicts her for lacking justice. Charity is taken from the word Latin “caritas.” You know…”the greatest of these?” “Deus caritas est?” Ring a bell? We need not fret over the author’s opinion. Blessed Teresa will, in the fullness of time, be raised to the honors of the Altar. Thomas Andrew says: In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 [Huffington Post] On May 10 the Washington National Cathedral dedicated a new stone carving of Rosa Parks. It will be displayed in the cathedral’s Human Rights Porch.The area already includes likenesses of Oscar Romero, the brave Catholic Archbishop of El Salvador, who spoke out against the U.S. for giving military aid to his country’s military junta and was killed in 1980 for his activism with workers and peasants fighting the regime; Eleanor Roosevelt, who came from a privileged background but used her position as first lady to be an ally with unions, civil rights groups, feminists, and other progressive movements; and John T. Walker, the first African American bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Washington and an activist who was an ally of South Africa’s Archbishop Desmond Tutu and was once arrested at a protest rally against apartheid at the South African Embassy.In a piece about the event broadcast on Saturday, National Public Radio’s Scott Simon reported that the statue of Parks was commissioned along with a carving of Mother Teresa that will be dedicated later this year.“They may have much to talk about,” Simon proclaimed at the end of the four-minute segment.A conversation between Rosa Parks and Mother Teresa would indeed be interesting. But it would probably not go along the lines that Simon’s glib comment implied, as if the seamstress and the nun shared a common approach to addressing the world’s ills. In fact, the statement on the National Cathedral’s website, that Parks and Mother Teresa belong in an area honoring “those who struggle to bring equality and social justice to all people” is incredibly misleading. Parks certainly fits that description, but Mother Teresa most certainly does not.Mother Teresa (1910-1997) dedicated her life to providing comfort to society’s victims, primarily neglected children, the sick, and the very poor. She founded the Missionaries of Charity, a Catholic order that now has 4,500 sisters and 610 missions in 123 countries that include orphanages, soup kitchens, hospices for the dying, homes for people with HIV/AIDS, leprosy and tuberculosis, and schools. Members take vows of chastity, poverty, obedience, and “wholehearted and free service to the poorest of the poor.”This is worthy work for which Mother Teresa deserves praise and received the Nobel Peace Prize. But it is a far cry from any “struggle to bring equality and social justice to all people.” Mother Teresa raised millions of dollars for her efforts, but she never challenged the system that caused such widespread suffering. To the contrary, Mother Teresa believed, according to people who worked with and wrote about her, that suffering would bring people closer to Jesus.Colette Livermore, a former Missionary of Charity, admired Mother Teresa’s courage and dedication, but ultimately left the order. As she describes in her book Hope Endures: Leaving Mother Teresa, Losing Faith, and Searching for Meaning, Livermore did not agree with what she called Mother Teresa’s “theology of suffering.”According to Mother Teresa’s philosophy, it is “the most beautiful gift for a person that he can participate in the sufferings of Christ.”In an article in Free Inquiry, writer Judith Hayes reported that Mother Teresa once approached a dying cancer patient not with pain killers but with a bit of theology. “You are suffering like Christ on the cross,” Mother Teresa allegedly told the patient. “So Jesus must be kissing you.” According to Hayes, the patient replied, “Then please tell him to stop kissing me.”The British newspaper The Guardian noted the “charges of gross neglect and physical and emotional abuse” in her orphanages. Two highly-respected medical journals — The Lancet and the British Medical Journal — reported that the quality of care in the Homes for the Dying was “haphazard.” Patients endured poor living conditions. Staff failed to use modern medical techniques and volunteers lacked basic medical knowledge. The staff didn’t distinguish between curable and incurable patients, putting some patients, who might otherwise survive, at risk of dying from infections. Sanal Edamaruku, President of Rationalist International, criticized her practice of failing to use painkillers. In her Homes for the Dying, one could “hear the screams of people having maggots tweezered from their open wounds without pain relief. On principle, strong painkillers are even in hard cases not given.”Rather than reduce suffering, in other words, Mother Teresa’s approach may actually have increased it.But even if Mother Teresa’s hospices, orphanages, and other institutions had been models of modern medicine and social work, the reality is that her approach to suffering was that of charity and pity.Mother Teresa accepted the economic and social conditions are they were and sought to relieve the immediate suffering of a handful of society’s victims. There was not even a pretense of seeking more “equality and social justice” — that is, a redistribution of economic resources or change in institutional practices and public policies, like land reform or more resources targeted for improved public health, education, and job creation.Rosa Parks (1913-2005) had an entirely different approach to suffering and injustice. Parks is often portrayed as an exhausted middle-aged seamstress from Montgomery who, wanting to rest her tired feet after a hard day at work, simply violated the city’s segregation law by refusing to move to the back of the bus. She is therefore revered as a selfless individual who, with one spontaneous act of courage, triggered the Montgomery bus boycott and became, as she is often called, the “mother of the civil rights movement.”What’s missing from the popular legend is the reality that Parks was a veteran activist whose defiance of segregation laws was not an isolated incident but a lifelong crusade. Also downplayed is that Parks was part of an ongoing movement whose leaders had been waiting for the right moment to launch a campaign against bus segregation. In Parks’ worldview, society’s victims required neither pity nor charity, but dignity and empowerment.Parks recalled, “I had almost a life history of being rebellious against being mistreated because of my color.” Discussing her grandfather, Sylvester Edwards, she wrote, “I remember that sometimes he would call white men by their first names, or their whole names, and not say, ‘Mister.’ How he survived doing all those kinds of things, and being so outspoken, talking that big talk, I don’t know, unless it was because he was so white and so close to being one of them.”In the 1930s, she and her husband, Raymond Parks, a barber, raised money for the defense of the Scottsboro Boys, nine young, black men falsely accused of raping two white women. Involvement in this controversial cause was extremely dangerous for southern blacks.In 1943, Parks became one of the first women to join the Montgomery chapter of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People and served for many years as chapter secretary and director of its youth group. In the 1940s and 1950s, the NAACP was considered a radical organization by most southern whites, especially politicians and police officials. Joining the NAACP put its members at risk of losing jobs and being subject to vigilante violence.Also in 1943, Parks made her first attempt to register to vote. Twice she was told she didn’t pass the literacy test, which was a Jim Crow invention to keep blacks from voting. In 1945, she passed the test and became one of the few blacks able to exercise the “right” to vote. As NAACP youth director, Parks helped black teenagers organize protests at the city’s segregated main public library because the library for blacks had fewer (and more outdated) books, but blacks were not allowed to study at the main branch or browse through its stacks.During the summer of 1955, Parks attended a ten-day interracial workshop at the Highlander Folk School, a training center for union and civil rights activists in rural Tennessee. Founded by Myles Horton in 1932, Highlander was one of the few places where whites and blacks — rank-and-file activists and left-wing radicals — could participate as equals. At the workshop that Parks attended, civil rights activists talked about strategies for implementing integration.For Parks, “One of my greatest pleasures there was enjoying the smell of bacon frying and coffee brewing and knowing that white folks were doing the preparing instead of me. I was 42 years old, and it was one of the few times in my life up to that point when I did not feel any hostility from white people.”The Highlander experience strengthened Parks’ resolve, showing her that it was possible for blacks and whites to live in “an atmosphere of complete equality” and without what she called “any artificial barriers of racial segregation.”Parks and other NAACP leaders had frequently talked about challenging Montgomery’s segregated bus system and the bus drivers’ abusive treatment of black riders. Bus segregation had long been a source of anger for southern blacks, including those in Montgomery, the state capital. “It was very humiliating having to suffer the indignity of riding segregated buses twice a day, five days a week, to go downtown and work for white people,” Parks recalled.In 1954, soon after the Supreme Court’s Brown decision outlawing school segregation, Jo Ann Robinson, an African American professor at the all-black Alabama State College, and a leader of Montgomery’s Women’s Political Council (WPC), wrote a letter to Montgomery mayor W.A. Gayle, saying that “there has been talk from 25 or more local organizations of planning a city-wide boycott of buses.” By the following year, the WPC made plans for a boycott and was waiting for the right person to be arrested — someone who would agree to test the segregation laws in court, and who was “above reproach.”In 1955, two teenage girls — Claudette Colvin and Mary Louise Smith — were arrested in separate incidents for refusing to give up their seats, but NAACP leader E. D. Nixon decided that neither of them was the right person around whom to mobilize the community. Parks, in contrast, was a pillar of the black community. She had graduated from high school, which was rare for a black woman in Montgomery then. At forty-two, she had a wide network of friends and admirers from her church and civil rights activities.On Thursday, December 1, 1955, Parks finished her work at the Montgomery Fair department store, boarded a city bus, and sat with three other blacks in the fifth row, the first row that blacks were allowed to occupy. A few stops later, the front four rows were filled with whites. One white man was left standing. According to law, blacks and whites could not occupy the same row, so the bus driver asked all four of the blacks seated in the fifth row to move. Three acquiesced, but Parks refused. The driver called the police and had Parks arrested.“People always say that I didn’t give up my seat because I was tired, but that isn’t true,” Parks later explained. “I was not tired physically, or no more tired than I usually was at the end of a working day. . . . No, the only tired I was, was tired of giving in.”Because of her reputation and web of friendships, word of Parks’ arrest spread quickly. What followed is one of the most amazing examples of effective organizing in American history. The bus boycott lasted for 381 days, organized by the Montgomery Improvement Association, a coalition of churches and civil rights groups. Throughout the year, MIA leaders successfully used church meetings, sermons, rallies, songs, and other activities to help maintain the black community’s spirits, nonviolent tactics, and resolve against the almost monolithic opposition of the city’s white business and political leaders who harassed the boycotters using every economic, legal, and police tool at their disposal. The segregationists also resorted to violence. They bombed the homes of boycott leaders, including Rev. Martin Luther King. On December 20, 1956, the Supreme Court ruled that the segregated bus system was unconstitutional. That day, an integrated group of boycotters, including King, rode the city buses.During the boycott, Parks and her husband lost their jobs. In 1957, they moved to Detroit, where Parks continued her quiet involvement in the civil rights movement. She worked for several years as a seamstress at a small factory in downtown Detroit. From 1965 until her retirement in 1988, Parks worked as an assistant in the Detroit office of U.S. Representative John Conyers, a founding member of the Congressional Black Caucus.A deeply religious woman, Parks did not believe that human suffering — whether from racism, low wages, or police abuse — was either inevitable or holy. She was part of a movement — network of organizations and activists who, over many years, battled segregation and injustice in the streets, churches, and courts. She believed in justice, not charity.As Martin Luther King once said, “Philanthropy is commendable, but it must not cause the philanthropist to overlook the circumstances of economic injustice which make philanthropy necessary.”Rosa Parks deserves to be in the same human rights pantheon as Bishop Romero and Eleanor Roosevelt. But not Mother Teresa.— Peter Dreier is the E.P. Clapp Distinguished Professor of Politics and chair of the Urban & Environmental Policy Department at Occidental College. His new book, The 100 Greatest Americans of the 20th Century: A Social Justice Hall of Fame, will be published by Nation Books in June. This commentary first appeared on Huffington Post. Rector Collierville, TN Submit a Job Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Submit a Press Release Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA Youth Minister Lorton, VA An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Rector Martinsville, VA Rector Albany, NY Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Director of Music Morristown, NJ Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Submit an Event Listing Press Release Service Rector Pittsburgh, PA Rector Knoxville, TN Featured Eventslast_img read more

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Program Budget and Finance issues statement on working budget

first_imgProgram Budget and Finance issues statement on working budget Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Course Director Jerusalem, Israel General Convention 2012, Program Budget & Finance General Convention, Rector Bath, NC Submit a Press Release [Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs] The following statement has been issued by the members of the Episcopal Church Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance, meeting on July 4 at the 77th General Convention of the Episcopal Church.At its first working meeting on July 4, the Joint Standing Committee on Program, Budget and Finance decided to utilize the Five Marks of Mission budget proposal here or http://www.episcopalchurch.org/sites/default/files/pbf_budget_template_5_marks_of_mission.pdf as its working template for the 2013-15 triennial budget. Program, Budget and Finance made that decision without commitment to any of the specific line items within the Five Marks of Mission proposal.Program, Budget and Finance made its decision because the Five Marks of Mission budget provides a clear missionary framework for budgeting and is based on updated information regarding income.  Program, Budget and Finance will continue its work of building and amending income and expense lines for the final budget presentation on Tuesday, July 10.Diane Pollard, Diocese of New York, Chair of Program, Budget and Finance, and Bishop Steven Lane, Diocese of Maine, Vice chair, on behalf of the members of Program, Budget and Finance.July 4, 2012 Featured Events Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR Rector Washington, DC This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Tampa, FL Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Episcopal Office of Public Affairs, AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Rector Collierville, TN Youth Minister Lorton, VA Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Rector Martinsville, VA Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Press Release Service Associate Rector Columbus, GA Rector Hopkinsville, KY TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Featured Jobs & Calls Submit a Job Listing Director of Music Morristown, NJ Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ Rector Knoxville, TN Rector Albany, NY Tags Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Rector Shreveport, LA Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Submit an Event Listing Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Rector Smithfield, NC Curate Diocese of Nebraska Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Posted Jul 4, 2012 Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Rector Belleville, IL Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Rector Pittsburgh, PA last_img read more

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Coupled Wagon House / Crescente Böhme Alemparte

first_imgCopyAbout this officeCrescente Böhme AlemparteOfficeFollowProductsWoodSteel#TagsProjectsBuilt ProjectsSelected ProjectsResidential ArchitectureHousingLoftCartagenaChilePublished on April 29, 2016Cite: “Coupled Wagon House / Crescente Böhme Alemparte ” 29 Apr 2016. ArchDaily. Accessed 11 Jun 2021. ISSN 0719-8884Browse the CatalogPartitionsSkyfoldChoosing the Skyfold Wall for Your SpaceGlass3MSun Control Film – Prestige ExteriorShowerhansgroheShowers – Croma SelectWall / Ceiling LightsSpectrum LightingLED Downlight – Infinium 3″ Round FlangelessVentilated / Double Skin FacadeCosentinoDekton Cladding in LD Sevilla hotelSealantsSikaJoint SealingBeams / PillarsLunawoodThermowood Frames and BearersPorcelain StonewareApariciPorcelain Tiles – MarblesCeramicsTerrealTerracotta Facade in Manchester HospitalWindowspanoramah!®ah! CornerHome AppliancesGIRAGira Keyless in – Door communicationLightsLinea Light GroupIntegrated Lighting – Fylo+More products »Save世界上最受欢迎的建筑网站现已推出你的母语版本!想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?是否翻译成中文现有为你所在地区特制的网站?想浏览ArchDaily中国吗?Take me there »✖You’ve started following your first account!Did you know?You’ll now receive updates based on what you follow! Personalize your stream and start following your favorite authors, offices and users.Go to my stream 2013 Coupled Wagon House / Crescente Böhme Alemparte Year:  Architects: Crescente Böhme Alemparte Area Area of this architecture project Coupled Wagon House / Crescente Böhme AlemparteSave this projectSaveCoupled Wagon House / Crescente Böhme Alemparte ArchDaily Area:  35 m² Year Completion year of this architecture project “COPY” Loft Save this picture!© Fernanda del Villar Jiménez+ 28 Share CopyLoft•Cartagena, Chile ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786372/acoplado-vagon-cartagena-crescente-bohme-alemparte Clipboard Chile Photographs Photographs:  Fernanda del Villar JiménezSave this picture!© Fernanda del Villar JiménezRecommended ProductsWoodParklex International S.L.Wood cladding – FacadeWindowsC.R. LaurenceCRL-U.S. Aluminum Unit-Glaze SystemWoodAccoyaAccoya® Cladding, Siding & FacadesWindowsVitrocsaMinimalist Window – SlidingText description provided by the architects. Based in Cartagena, Valparaiso Chile, the project is located in a subdivision area, small plots and home built by their owners. The exact site is a parcel of land of approximately 10 x 20 meters, with a gradient of approximately 15% that runs along the lots from east to west.Save this picture!First Floor PlanThe land has been inhabited (or occupied) for the last ten years by a train car. It worked as a sleeping wagon, and recently adjusted to something like a stationary home living place by an old lady who used to work as an English teacher, and who lives alone since 2010.Save this picture!Courtesy of Crescente Böhme AlemparteSave this picture!Courtesy of Crescente Böhme AlemparteBecause of the land, since its very narrow, and its rare in front of the sea, the train car was re-located  along its diagonal , seeking a foreshorteningview of the sea , but with no success given the conditions of the land itself.Save this picture!© Fernanda del Villar JiménezThe requirement is modest but significant, it has been asked to extend the zone inhabited and sum a bedroom, living room, bathroom and a terrace in a space of no more than 35 M2. Therefore we design a strategy which consist in building   a metallic squared table of 6.2 x 5.3 meters, as far as it can be from the front, passing under the train car, and set up a volumetrically independent body above it, all interconnected by interior stairs.Save this picture!ModelSave this picture!SectionWe thought of a neutral and contemporary esthetic, trying to make -and highlight-   a difference with the train car, while it allows to conserve its identity and presence by contrast. However, and despite their difference, there are two elements taken from the image of the train car, in an attitude of rescuing and re-interpreting its preexistence: steel and wood. Thus, in order to achieve this idea, we designed a structure based in pillars and diagonals of steel, as the support of the volume sheathe by wooden slats and painted in black to highlight the red in the train car.Save this picture!© Fernanda del Villar JiménezProject gallerySee allShow lessWill A UK Power Station Become the Most Expensive Thing Ever Built?Architecture NewsMARC FORNES/THEVERYMANY Design “Spineway” in San AntonioArchitecture NewsProject locationAddress:Cartagena, Cartagena, Valparaiso, ChileLocation to be used only as a reference. It could indicate city/country but not exact address. Share Projects “COPY” ShareFacebookTwitterPinterestWhatsappMailOrhttps://www.archdaily.com/786372/acoplado-vagon-cartagena-crescente-bohme-alemparte Clipboardlast_img read more

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‘Extend tax foreclosure moratorium!’

first_imgActivists in Detroit picketed the Michigan state building on April 16 to demand a permanent moratorium on tax foreclosures and a reassessment of all homes located in Detroit and Wayne County, needed to reduce grossly inflated tax bills. They demanded the Michigan State Housing Development Authority use the remaining $250 million in federal “Hardest Hit Homeowners” funds to pay back taxes and keep people in their homes. This money, which was meant to help low-income homeowners avoid foreclosure, is currently tagged for “blight removal,” that is, tearing down homes throughout the city.Popular pressure resulted March 31 in the Wayne County Treasurer’s Office announcing a six-week deadline extension for delinquent tax payments. Activists with Moratorium NOW! Coalition say the delay must be extended past May 12 until the crisis can be resolved. There are still 37,000 owner-occupied home seizures pending, and more than 62,000 tax foreclosures overall are set to take place.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thisFacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmailPrintMoreShare thislast_img read more

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Hoosier Ag Today Awards 4-H Communications Scholarship

first_imgHome Indiana Agriculture News Hoosier Ag Today Awards 4-H Communications Scholarship Facebook Twitter SHARE SHARE Hoosier Ag Today Awards 4-H Communications Scholarship Facebook Twitter By Gary Truitt – Oct 17, 2017 Crystal XueFor the 12th consecutive year, Hoosier Ag Today has awarded a scholarship to a high achieving Indiana 4-H member for their communications skills. Presented at the Scholarship Recognition Luncheon at the 2017 Indiana 4-H Congress, the award was made to Crystal Xue of Hamilton County. She is a senior at Carmel High School who plans on a career in public service. Xue was the 2016 Public Speaking Achievement Award winner in Hamilton County and was the Professional Persuasive Presentation Sweepstakes winner at the 2016 Indiana State Fair.Xue said good communication skills, both oral and written, are vital in both one’s personal and professional lives. She said her 4-H experience given her the chance to develop her communications skills and the self-confidence to use them. “She is a very impressive young woman who has the talent and drive to do great things,” said Gary Truitt, President of Hoosier Ag Today.Janet HolcombAn example of how 4-H can prepare young people for later achievements was demonstrated by the keynote speaker at the luncheon, Indiana’s First Lady Janet Holcomb. Mrs. Holcomb was a 10 year, 4-H member and related how her 4-H background prepared her for her career in business and public service.Forty-two 4-Hers received scholarships during the program, sponsored by some of Indiana’s top agribusinesses and the Indiana 4-H Foundation. The scholarship luncheon was sponsored by CountryMark and the Indiana State Department of Agriculture. Previous articleDow AgroSciences and ADM Collaborate to Bring Enlist E3™ Soybeans to U.S. FarmersNext articleIndiana Crops Moving Toward Maturity Gary Truittlast_img read more

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Soccer rolls to third consecutive victory with 1-0 win over rival SMU

first_imgTCU rowing program strengthens after facing COVID-19 setbacks Jack is a junior journalism major and studio art minor from Atlanta, Georgia. He enjoys everything sports and co-runs the Blanket Coverage podcast as well as photographs for TCU360. Facebook Jack Wallacehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jack-wallace/ printTCU soccer’s win streak extended to three games after a 1-0 win over Metroplex rivals SMU Sunday.“When you come across town to a ranked opponent and face a challenging environment and opponent and come out with a 1-0 win, that makes me pretty proud of our team,” head coach Eric Bell said.The Mustangs heavily outshot the Horned Frogs, with 16 shots to TCU’s seven.TCU’s Gracie Bryan recorded her fourth goal of the season, securing a three-match scoring streak. She is responsible for four of the nine TCU goals this season.Junior Tara Smith provided the lone assist, the ninth of her career and fifth of the season, which marks a career high.The win also brought TCU to a third consecutive shutout, outscoring opponents 9-0 over the last three outings. Emily Alvarado, TCU’s starting goalkeeper, has allowed only two goals over the Frogs’ first four matches.“When she needs to, she is able to make some incredible saves,” Bell said regarding Alvarado. “We have to count on her from time to time to do that and that is something I have confidence in her to do. She played very well in goal today.”This win gives TCU a 4-1-1 record over the last six meetings with the Mustangs, an even more impressive record considering the 0-2-25 start the Frogs had, dating back to 1986.TCU will return home for a two-match homestand this week, beginning with Little Rock at 7 p.m. Thursday night. Jack Wallacehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jack-wallace/ Previous articleHoroscope: September 2, 2019Next articleHoroscope: September 3, 2019 Jack Wallace RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Linkedin Another series win lands TCU Baseball in the top 5, earns Sikes conference award 2021 NFL Mock Draft (Part 1) Special Jack Wallacehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jack-wallace/ TCU News Now 4/28/2021 Twittercenter_img + posts Facebook ReddIt Twitter ReddIt Jack Wallacehttps://www.tcu360.com/author/jack-wallace/ 2020/21 NFL Exit Interviews – NFC East 2020/21 NFL Exit Interviews – NFC West Jack Wallace Linkedin TCU baseball finds their biggest fan just by saying hellolast_img read more

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Twin Town businesses urged to attend meeting over traffic chaos

first_img Journey home will be easier – Paul Hegarty Twin Town businesses urged to attend meeting over traffic chaos DL Debate – 24/05/21 Facebook FT Report: Derry City 2 St Pats 2 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Pinterest Previous articleTraffic calming measures for ‘treacherous’ housing estateNext articlePolice deal with fifth night of disorder in Bogside News Highland AudioHomepage BannerNews Harps come back to win in Waterford Pinterestcenter_img Facebook Google+ WhatsApp By News Highland – July 12, 2018 Twitter All businesses in the Twin Towns are being urged to attend a meeting to discuss and agree traffic management options for the area from now until December.The meeting is taking place on Monday next at 2pm in the BASE.Later in the week, the Council’s Director of Roads and transportation John McLaughlin will meet with business representatives to consider the options to alleviate the severe traffic congestion of late.Cathaorileach of the Stranorlar Municipal District Cllr Patrick McGowan is hopeful that some interim solutions found:Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/pmgcghcvbcvbmeeting.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Derry draw with Pats: Higgins & Thomson Reaction Google+ Twitter News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24thlast_img read more

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Part-timers’ pension

first_img Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article The £45m Horse Totalisator Board pension fund is considering setting up a separate group personal pension scheme to help it meet the legal requirements of the Part-Time Work Directive.The directive, which came into force earlier this year, requires employers to treat part-time staff the same as full-time employees when it comes to employee benefits such as pensions. It has been predicted that this could lead to problems for employers where certain categories of employee are not allowed membership of the pension fund.George Waple, pensions manager at the Tote, said, “This means we have got to look at pension provision pre-stakeholder. Part-timers are not currently allowed in the scheme.”He said that the Tote was unlikely to extend the eligibility of the fund because a final salary scheme might not be suitable for part-time staff.Instead it is looking at the possibility of setting up a group personal pension plan. He added that in terms of stakeholder the scheme was likely to extend its membership rather than create another fund. Part-timers’ pensionOn 12 Sep 2000 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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JUST IN: Evansville Police Department (“EPD”) Declared That They Have No Confidence In…

first_img7. Do you have confidence in Chief Bolin’s ability to effectively lead the Evansville Police Department?74% NOBetween 2010 and 2012, prior to Chief Bolin’s appointment as chief, Evansville recorded an average of 5 homicides per year; under Chief Bolin, the homicide average has risen to 13 per year. Prior to Chief Bolin’s appointment, the average number of assaults per year totaled 280; that average increased to 507 in 2016 and 2017. Perhaps most notably, the violent crime rate in Evansville has nearly doubled from 235.5 per population of 100,000 in 2011 to 402.1 in 2017. Meanwhile, the national crime rate during that same time frame remained steady.Despite the rising crime rate, the number of motor patrol officers working the street has decreased. In 2011, the EPD employed 138 motor patrol officers. At the beginning of 2018, the EPD employed only 110 motor patrol officers. On most days, the EPD is at minimum staffing levels of patrol officers. This lack of manpower has resulted in slower response times and decreased the safety of our citizens. Officers often cannot proactively patrol our neighborhoods because there are too few of them to do anything other than respond to calls. The back-up times for officers are much slower because of the lack of manning, posing a risk to the safety of those officers. Although the FOP has attempted to address the manning issue with Chief Bolin many times, he consistently denies that the lack of staffing of motor patrol is an issue.Rather than focusing on the safety of our citizens and the day-to-day operations of the department, Chief Bolin chooses to expend his energy, efforts, and taxpayer dollars on projects that are important to him. Although the FOP certainly agrees that community outreach is very important, the Chief’s projects and relationship with the media should not take precedence over public and officer safety. The Chief is quick to pay overtime to officers who work his special events; yet, the number of patrol cars available for officers to use to patrol our streets is grossly inadequate. Many officers are required to “double-up” in patrol cars or drive rundown vehicles because Chief Bolin chooses not to allocate funds for vehicles.Chief Bolin’s poor decision-making with regard to personnel issues has also led to low morale within the EPD. Under Chief Bolin, good officers who perform their jobs well have been removed from their positions or reassigned contrary to the best interest of the department.In short, the officers of the FOP have no confidence in Chief Bolin’s ability to effectively lead the EPD. Unfortunately, in the past, Chief Bolin has dismissed the officers’ concerns, stating to the FOP leadership that the concerns they have brought to him are the concerns of only a few who like to engage in, as Chief Bolin calls them, “boogeyman theories.” The FOP hopes that the outcome of this vote will lead Chief Bolin to realize that the concerns that have been brought to him are, in fact, real and need to be addressed. The FOP further hopes that this vote will effectuate change to better ensure the safety of Evansville citizens and police officers and improve the operations of the EPD.The FOP President will hold a press conference at 3:30 p.m. on September 19, 2019, at the FOP Lodge, located at 801 Court Street. On September 18, 2019, officers of the Evansville Police Department (“EPD”) declared by vote that they have no confidence in Chief Billy Bolin as Chief of the EPD. All active officers of the EPD are members of the Fraternal Order of Police Lodge 73. This is the first time in its history that the FOP Lodge 73 has held a vote of no confidence in its chief.Chief Bolin has alleged on social media that the FOP leadership has “made fun” of his motto of “Be Nice.” This vote had nothing to do with whether Chief Bolin is a nice guy. Instead, the question is whether he effectively leads the EPD to ensure the safety of Evansville citizens and of the police officers who work under him. EPD officers have overwhelmingly stated that he does not.The questions presented on the ballot and the results were as follows:1. As an Evansville Police Officer, do you believe the citizens of Evansville are safer and crime has been reduced under Chief Bolin?78% NO2. Do you believe Chief Bolin ensures adequate staffing of motor patrol to provide for the safety of citizens?84% NO3. Does Chief Bolin prioritize the duties of law enforcement officers and the everyday functions of the Evansville Police Department over media relations?82% NO4. Has Chief Bolin’s elimination of the traditional chain of command improved performance and morale within the ranks of the Evansville Police Department?80% NO5. Are taxpayer dollars appropriately allocated within the Evansville Police Department under Chief Bolin?72% NO6. Are policies and procedures, including those pertaining to discipline, administered fairly and consistently within the Evansville Police Department under Chief Bolin?77% NOcenter_img FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more