qtapzqce

UPSC Extra Chance : ‘Completely Unjustified To Not Relax Age Limit’, Divan Argues In SC For Last Attempt Candidates

first_imgTop StoriesUPSC Extra Chance : ‘Completely Unjustified To Not Relax Age Limit’, Divan Argues In SC For Last Attempt Candidates Radhika Roy9 Feb 2021 1:39 AMShare This – xSenior Advocate Shyam Divan argued in the Supreme Court on Tuesday for granting extra-chance without upper age limit for civil service aspirants who gave their last attempt in the UPSC exams held in October 2020.”It’s completely unjustified to not relax the limit. They have a power and the duty to relax this”, Divan submitted before a bench headed by Justice AM Khanwilkar.While acknowledging…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginSenior Advocate Shyam Divan argued in the Supreme Court on Tuesday for granting extra-chance without upper age limit for civil service aspirants who gave their last attempt in the UPSC exams held in October 2020.”It’s completely unjustified to not relax the limit. They have a power and the duty to relax this”, Divan submitted before a bench headed by Justice AM Khanwilkar.While acknowledging that relaxation of age limit was ultimately a policy decision, Divan submitted that the yardstick for consideration should be different this year in view of the extraordinary difficulties caused by the COVID-19 pandemic.”In an ordinary year, this argument would not be entertained or appreciated. But this year, it is not ordinary”, Divan submitted.The Centre has already agreed to give an extra-chance to those candidates who had exhausted their last attempt in October 2020. However, the Centre’s relaxation was subject to the condition that such candidates should not be age-barred.Today, the bench comprising Justices Khanwilkar, Indu Malhotra and Ajay Rastogi was hearing the arguments of the petitioners seeking the relaxation of the age-bar condition as well.Highlights from Divan’s submissionsHe submitted that there were past precedents of Centre granting age relaxation. He then elaborated on the impact caused by the pandemic and the lockdown on the preparations for exams.Coaching classes were also not there. Plus, because of the pandemic, there was disruption in their homes. Then many were frontline workers who had to be at the frontline, duty-bound both by law and their conscience.The crucial point is that some books were not available. Only shops and libraries have these books. It is not feasible to read pages and pages of material on phones and laptops.Of course, one can say that the material is there on the internet. But, there’s no realistic way for a candidate to do well unless she has the indexed material.Other people from metros may have superior internet connections which others across the country may not have. Then there’s the issue of essential workers. They had to subordinate their personal interest of appearing in the exam to that.He also submitted that the pandemic has impacted different sections differently.  For instance, take gender. Working women had enormous domestic difficulties in addition to their work.”It’s not that we are saying that “give us a job or give us a remuneration or something”. We’re only saying that give us one attempt which we lost in 2020. The overwhelming circumstances of the pandemic which impacted society”, he said.”The popular expression is “the year was cancelled”. But, the exam was not cancelled”, he added.He mentioned that the beneficiaries of age-relaxation will be around 2300.”Why should someone who faced the exact same difficulties due to pandemic be denied the benefit of extra chance just because of their age?” Shyam Divan argued before the Bench.According to Divan, extra chance and age bar relaxation are “inter-twined” and such last chance candidates should be treated as a “homogenous class”.He submitted that the age bar given to the aspirants in the year 2015 was 34 years whereas if the same is given this year, the aspirants will be giving the exam at 33 years of age and hence it will not make much of difference. He also said that there was never a uniform policy with respect to age-bar. It has varied from 24 to 34 years over the years. The arguments are in progress before the bench. Live Update may be read here.Next Storylast_img read more

qtapzqce

Data guidance delay

first_img Previous Article Next Article The code of practice on the use of employee data expected this month isunlikely to be out before March, according to the Information Commission. Employers need the code to help clarify confusion, particularly over staffe-mails and internet use. The Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act 2000 and its associatedregulations appear to justify covert monitoring of communications without priorconsent for a wide range of reasons. But the Information Commissioner’s draft code of practice indicated thatconsent and knowledge would be necessary in every case. A recent survey indicated that 60 per cent of work e-mails are personal. Data guidance delayOn 1 Feb 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Comments are closed. last_img read more

qtapzqce

Comeback Effort Comes Up Short for BYU Baseball

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailALBUQUERQUE – BYU baseball came back from six runs down but a New Mexico walk-off single gave the Lobos the 8-7 victory on Thursday.Game SummaryThe Cougars scored six runs in the seventh inning alone to tie the gameDown one, BYU scored another run in the ninth to again tie the LobosNew Mexico hit a two-out single in the bottom of the ninth to winPlayer HighlightsHobbs Nyberg: 3-5, 2B, 3B, R, 2 RBIJoshua Cowden: 2-3, R, RBIAndrew Pintar: 1-4, R, BB, RBIFour runs in the fourth on six singles and then a run apiece in the fifth and sixth innings appeared to have New Mexico running away with the game. But in the top of the seventh, Jaren Hall hit a single in his first at bat of the season before Joshua Cowden added a base hit as well.After Peyton Cole reached first to load the bases, the Cougars finally scored on a walk by Andrew Pintar, then added two more with a double from Hobbs Nyberg. Hayden Leatham brought in a another run and reached safely on a error, then Mitch McIntyre hit an RBI-single. After Cutter Clawson drew a walk, Hall again came to the plate and scored Leatham on a groundout to short to tie the game, 6-6.The Lobos answered right back, scoring a run on three-straight singles. BYU then had a chance to tie or take the lead in the eighth with runners on the corners off a Bryan Call walk and the first hit of the year by Cole to put runners on the corners with no outs. But the Lobos got out of the jam without allowing a run thanks to three strikeouts.The Cougar batters continued to fight in the final inning with Clawson hitting a lead-off single. Pitcher Ben Weese came in as a pinch runner, stealing second and then scoring when Cowden dropped a single to center field.But in the bottom of the ninth and the bases loaded with two outs after a single and two intentional walks, an infield single scored the Lobo runner from third to win it for New Mexico.Nyberg finished a home run short of hitting for the cycle, going 3-for-5 with two RBIs and a run. Cowden went 2-for-3 with a run and an RBI. On the mound, starter Justin Sterner went five innings and allowed 10 hits and five runs with five strikeouts. Coming on in the ninth, Reid McLaughlin took the loss to go to 2-1 on the year.BYU and New Mexico will next play a doubleheader on Friday, Feb. 28, starting at noon MT in the second and third games of a four-game series. February 27, 2020 /Sports News – Local Comeback Effort Comes Up Short for BYU Baseball Robert Lovell Tags: BYU Cougars Baseball/New Mexico Lobos Written bylast_img read more

qtapzqce

Dean criticised over Christ Church racism response

first_imgOxford students have expressed disappointment over the response of the Dean, the Very Revd Prof Martyn Percy, to allegations of racism at the Christ Church Porters’ Lodge. As Cherwell reported in Third Week, two black Oxford students alleged that some porters at Christ Church treated them adversely on the basis of race. In one incident, black students entering the College were asked by a porter whether they were “construction workers”. Porters have also persistently asked a black member of the College to show his Bod card, even as his white guests enter College premises unchallenged.Responding to the allegations, Professor Percy told Cherwell, “We are sorry that some members of the University appear to have felt it inappropriate to be asked to show their University cards.  “At the beginning of any academic year, it is normal practice for our Custodians and Porters to ask to see proof of identity on a regular basis for the first month or so. “This is an especially busy time for tourism. As a newcomer to Christ Church myself, I have also been asked to show my ID on entry on several occasions, and I applaud the thorough and professional approach taken by our porters and custodians.” Prof Percy’s response has been the subject of vocal criticism. Dylan Collins, a Rhodes Scholar and member of Christ Church, took to social media to voice his concerns. He said, “I am extremely disappointed in the Dean’s response. I enter and exit the grounds multiple times a day, every day, and have only been asked on one occasion for my identification after a particularly busy Evensong. I’m not sure what the Dean means by ‘regular basis’ or which ‘normal practice’ he refers to.” Linacre Rhodes Scholar, Paul Amayo, who was asked whether he was a “construction worker”, remarked, “I find the Dean’s comments dismissive and very troubling; he fails to acknowledge not only that a wrong has been done to us but by endorsing and even applauding the porters’ behaviour he ensures that racially biased acts will continue to be carried out under the guise of professionalism.” Ntokozo Qwabe, a Rhodes Scholar at Keble, labelled the Dean’s response “dismissive” and the “ultimate model of how not to deal with issues of race when they arise”. He added, “[Prof Percy’s comments] reflect a grave lack of leadership and failure to provide direction when needed most. This whole saga shows just what an existential burden it is for a person in black skin to experience racism in supposedly progressive institutions which are dominated and led by white people (who, by necessity, have not ever had to deal with existing in a black skin). “The correct way of dealing with this case would have been, at the very least, to get all the relevant parties to the table and to begin a conversation about the issues which arise from it.” OUSU’s newly elected Black & Minority Ethnic Students’ & Anti-Racism Officer, Nikhil Venkatesh commented, “All allegations of racism are very serious, and I was disappointed that the Dean, in his response to this story, dismissed the allegation rather than taking it seriously and promising to investigate it thoroughly.” Aliya Yule, TeamWomen candidate for OUSU Women’s Campaign Officer, remarked, “By refusing in his statement to even acknowledge that the porters seemed to consistently only ask students of colour for their Bodcards, it indicates the college does not take accusations of racism seriously and is willing to ignore the experiences raised by several students of colour.” One student, however, “trusted that the Dean will ultimately respond to student concerns appropriately.” In a fresh response to students’ reactions, Prof Percy told Cherwell, “We do take such matters very seriously, and when they are reported to us, we seek to address them with appropriate rigour. When issues like this come up — very seldom, I am pleased to say — we deal with the concerns carefully and conscientiously. We have no further comment to make regarding the specific incidents that you refer to.”last_img read more

qtapzqce

OULC Co-Chair resigns, citing antisemitism within club

first_imgAlex Chalmers, Co-Chair of the Oxford University Labour Club, resigned Monday evening, stating that he could “no longer in good conscience defend club policy.”In a Facebook post Monday explaining his decision, Chalmers wrote that he perceived that, “A large proportion of both OULC and the student left in Oxford more generally have some kind of problem with Jews.”He cited OULC’s decision on Monday to endorse Israel Apartheid Week (IAW) as the immediate cause of his resignation. Israel Apartheid Week is an annual series of lectures against Israel occupation of the West Bank and Gaza, and in support of Boycott, Divest and Sanction (BDS) movements.He wrote that he felt the club was “becoming increasingly riven by factional splits, and despite its avowed committment to liberation, the attitudes of certain members of the club towards certain disadvantaged groups was becoming posionous. Whether it be members of the Executive throwing around the term ‘Zio’ (a term for Jews usually confined to websites run by the Ku Klux Klan) with casual abandon, senior members of the club expressing their ‘solidarity’ with Hamas and explitictly defending their tactics of indiscriminately murdering civilians, or a former Co-Chair claiming that ‘most accusations of antisemitism are just the Zionists crying wolf’, a large proportion of both OULC and the student left in Oxford more generally have some kind of problem with Jews.“The decision of the club to endorse a movement with a history of targetting and harassing Jewish students and inviting antisemitic speakers to campuses, despite the concerns of Jewish students, illustrates how uneven and insincere much of the active membership is when it comes to liberation. I had hoped during my tenure as Co-Chair to move the club away from some of its more intolerant tendencies: sadly, it only continued to move away from me, to a place I could no longer hope to retrieve it from.”Chalmers was referring to a motion passed by a vote of 18-16 at Monday’s OULC meeting which stated that the group “formally [endorsed] Oxford IAW.” OULC further resolved to publicize this decision to its “members so a wide audience of people attend IAW events” and “mandate the Co-Chairs,” which would have included Chalmers, “to make our opposition to the apartheid in Palestine if invited to comment by the media on related subject matters”. Current and past members of OULC have expressed differing opinions.Former Co-Chair David-Cesar Heymann endorsed Chalmers’ stance, telling Cherwell, “Alex has contributed a great deal to OULC, and recently took a courageous and principled decision. In doing so, he raised pressing concerns about anti-Semitism in the Oxford Hard Left. As his statement explains, anti-Semitism is a common ocurrence among the hard left, with slurs such as ‘Zio’, apologism of Hamas and other terrorist organizations, and casual dismissals of anti-Semitism as ‘crying wolf’ being common. The decision of the hard left within OULC to suport the one sided demonization of Israel that is Israeli Apartheid Week is only the most recent example of a long, troubling pattern; and I can fully understand, and sympathize with Alex not wanting to have anything to do with this disgraceful decision. “Ella Taylor, Women’s Officer-elect, who is herself Jewish, said “[OULC] is a vibrant, well led, diverse group. At its events I constantly meet interesting and inspiring people with a whole spectrum of views and whose opinions are well informed and interesting. Last night however, I witnessed a side to the club which was thoroughly unpleasant and I am increasingly becoming aware of some of the awful outbursts about Jews which have been made over the past 12 months. “I understand Alex’s position, but am looking forward both to running the events we’ve organised for the rest of the term, and to contributing to an ongoing discussion about the complex intersection of justice for Palestine and the safety of Jewish students.”Oxford University Jewish Society also issued a statement, saying, “Oxford University Jewish Society is saddened by the anti-semitic reports coming out of Oxford University Labour Club, and stands fully in support of Alex Chalmers’ decision to resign.“We are, however, unsurprised by this news. It is not the first time that Oxford JSoc has had to deal with anti-semitic incidents within the student left and it will not be the last. It is a significant and worrying issue and one that on many occasions, Jewish students have felt that they are fighting alone. We are grateful that Alex Chalmers has made the statement that he did and has brought the issue of anti-semitism to the fore in a way that Jewish students have so far been denied.“Oxford JSoc strongly rejects any accusation that Jewish students are inventing claims of anti-semitism to discredit Palestinian solidarity politics. This is a repeated trope that has been used to silence Jewish students and it will carry weight no longer. When anti-semitism intersects with Palestinian solidarity politics, it is not the job of Jewish students to be quiet, but the job of Palestinian solidarity activists to rid their movement of anti-Jewish prejudice.“Many of Oxford’s Jewish students who hold progressive views have long felt excluded from left-wing political spaces. Jewish students who raised the issue of anti-semitism at the OULC meeting were laughed at and mocked. It is high time that this issue is confronted. We hope Alex’s resignation triggers a broader awakening amongst student political movements, and that anti-semitism, particularly on the student left, is finally taken seriously.The national group Labour Students said they “were deeply troubled to hear reports of anti-semitism at one of our most prominent Labour Clubs. We unequivocally condemn any form of anti-semitism. We are taking these allegations very seriously and will do whatever is necessary to ensure every Labour Club is a safe space for Jewish Students. We are proud of the long history we have of working with the Union of Jewish Students and the National Union of Students to protect Jewish students on campus and this will always be a top priority for Labour Students.” Chalmers told Cherwell, ”Leaving OULC was a difficult decision, but it had reached the stage where I no longer recognised the club that I joined last Michaelmas. I hope my decision will go some way in raising awareness of the campus antisemitism that has gone unnoticed for far too long in Oxford.”His Co-Chair Noni Csogor said, “I’m deeply upset by Alex’s decision to resign, but it’s one I respect; his commitment to his principles is honestly admirable, and he is – and will remain – one of my close friends.“That said, I was heartened by the healthy and – while passionate – civil nature of the debate this evening. The persuasiveness of both sides of the argument is obvious from the result, 18-16 in favour, and I’m glad we as a club can be a place for this kind of democratic debate. We did not vote on a blanket position on the Israel-Palestine conflict; we voted to support Oxford’s Israeli Apartheid Week. At Oxford, IAW has hosted a wide variety of Israeli, Palestinian, and South African speakers, such as Denis Goldberg, who fought against apartheid in South Africa, and Oxford professors like Avi Shlaim, Karma Nabulsi, Sudhir Hazareesingh, and David Priestland. As the motion notes, OULC and the Labour Party have always been against racism and oppression in all its forms; this must include the policies of the current Israeli government.“That said, it also includes anti-Semitism. Alex is right to highlight growing anti-Semitic violence in the UK as a major issue; it’s also horrifying that Jewish students feel unsafe on campuses. It’s unsurprising, given incidents like that at KCL Israel Society a few weeks ago, and I’m sure OULC members would join me in condemning the silencing of Jewish students, who often have uniquely nuanced perspectives on the Israeli state. Jewish students spoke on both sides of the debate this evening, but we take allegations of anti-Semitism in the club very seriously and I will be discussing, with my executive committee, how to deal with the kinds of statements Alex mentions, and what concrete steps we can take in future to preserve a club that’s been a safe haven for Jewish students in the past. “I am not used to eyes being rolled when I start a sentence with ‘as a Jew’. Not only that, but I was astounded to hear the comparison of Jewish concerns about anti semitism during Israel Apartheid Week with straight people feeling uncomfortable attending LGBTQ+ night clubs. This is a problem that needs to be tackled head on. The club has an overwhelming number of members who are able to tackle the question of Israel Palestine appropriately – Zionist or not Zionist and who don’t use racist slurs and anti-semitism.“Therefore I think that from both within OULC and in the wider community this issue can be tackled and I hope to be involved in working to remove the racist undertones that have surfaced of late. This isn’t a question of support for Palestine or Israel, but a question of helping fight against a rising tide of anti-semitism and ensuring all students of any religion or race feel safe.”However former Social Secretary Michael Muir told Cherwell, “We had a heated but not hostile discussion and voted to support a week of action that brings together Israeli, Palestinian and international activists and scholars to draw attention to Palestinian human rights causes. We are sorry that one of our members felt this was a resigning issue; we take the welfare of our members very seriously.”And Aliya Yule, a member of OULC and organising member of Oxford Jewish Students for Justice in Palestine, said “We are saddened to see the very serious allegation of anti-Semitism being used as an argument against those standing up for Palestinian human rights: it is imperative to reiterate that being critical of Israeli apartheid is not in itself anti-Semitic. Oxford Jewish Students for Justice in Palestine is delighted that OULC voted to endorse Israeli Apartheid Week, and we are proud to be helping organise a week committed to anti-racist, anti-colonial politics.“As Jewish students, we are committed to the ongoing battle against anti-Semitism, and we don’t tolerate it from any quarter. The OULC meeting saw much healthy debate, and none of it was anti-Semitic. Passionate supporters of Israel like Alex Chalmers are of course entitled to their strongly held views, but so too are those of us profoundly concerned by Israel’s human rights abuses. Anti-Semitism is a poison, and it shouldn’t be cheapened by misleading allegations like this.”Another former Co-Chair, Charlie Atkins, focused on the greater unity of OULC, saying, “Any situation that leads to a Co-Chair resigning is regrettable. The club should be – and in my experience has always proven itself to be in the past – a welcoming environment for party members with a range of political views. I think it’s vital that all OULC members cooperate and focus on helping the party put forward a positive vision for the country and winning public support. The club has a long and successful past and so I am confident it will be able to once again play its part in returning the Labour party to power.”One Labour Party MP, John Mann, also commented on Chalmers’ comments, saying “The use of the term Zio as an abuse by some Oxford so-called left-wingers is comparable to the language of Pegida zealots,” in reference to a far-right anti-Muslim group in Germany.“Overt anti-Semitism rife amongst certain elements at Oxford University. These casual racists need to be directly challenged and more,” Mann said.last_img read more

qtapzqce

WORTMAN, STEPHANIE GERALDINE (nee: Mastrangelo)

first_img92, a lifelong resident of Bayonne, passed away surrounded by her family and caregivers on May 19, 2017. Stephanie worked as the Secretary to the General of MOTBY for several years before retiring. She was the wife to the late Edwin L. Wortman and mother to Joanne and her husband Lief Solensten and to Richard A. and his wife Lois. Stephanie was also the grandmother to Richard L. Wortman and his wife Erica, Kathryn E. Pantages and her husband Nicholas, Derek Solensten & Jared Solensten, and the great-grandmother of Maxx & Hudson Wortman and Ava, Harper & Reilly Pantages. Stephanie was pre-deceased by her sisters Elizabeth, Aurelia & Frances. She is survived by a host of other family members and friends. Funeral arrangements by MIGLIACCIO Funeral Home, 851 Kennedy Blvd.last_img read more

qtapzqce

Ocean City Lawsuit Recovers Some Costs From Aborted Dredging Work

first_imgTHE ABORTED PROJECTAmid some fanfare, Ocean City restarted a bayside dredging program when it awarded a $1,819,422 to Hydro-Marine Construction, which started work in September 2012 to dredge the lagoons between 34th Street and 15th Street.The areas were to be dredged to a minimum depth of four feet (at low water) and average of five feet — with some spots six feet deep.From the start, work  was slow. The contractor got an extension on a permit that expired Nov. 30 but still did not complete work by the end of a new permitting window on Dec. 31, 2012. Work was scheduled to resume on July 1, 2013. But the contractor never returned.The dredging company did not finish work at Carnival Bayou Lagoon (between 16th and 17th streets) or at parts of Venetian Bayou Lagoon (between 17th and 18th streets) and Clubhouse Lagoon (between Waterway Road and Clubhouse Drive).Despite the incomplete work, Council voted last summer to authorize a final payment to close out a $1,829,655 contract with Hydro-Marine Construction.The final payment represented a $10,234 increase over the original contract price.The site where the dredge spoils were permitted to be dumped did not have as much capacity as was originally estimated, Ocean City Community Operations Director Roger McLarnon said at the time.The final contract figure was reduced for the dredging work that was not completed but increased for extra work in preparing the spoils site to accept the material that was able to be pumped there, he said. The net was about the same $1.8 million that the contract called for. THE LAWSUITOcean City filed its complaint against Duffield in July 2014 — at about the same time it paid off Hydro-Marine Construction.The complaint states that Ocean City selected Site 83 (an approved disposal site in the marshes near Roosevelt Boulevard) based on Duffield’s recommendation.But the complaint alleges that Duffield “failed to adequately investigate, evaluate, analyze and test existing conditions for Plaintiff’s intended use of (the site).”“Duffield failed to design the expansion of CDF83 in such a way that the Plaintiff ‘s project could be completed,” the complaint alleges. “As a result of Duffield’ s said failure, construction methods had to be changed, portions of the project were delayed. The project, as a whole, could not be completed and the Plaintiff’s costs were increased.”Duffield was not the low bidder on a 2011 professional services contract for “investigation, permitting and preparation of construction plans for the disposal of dredge material.” But the company was awarded a professional services contract based, in part, on its reputation for good work.__________Sign up for OCNJ Daily’s free newsletter and breaking news alerts“Like” us on Facebook A professional assessment of the capacity of a dredging disposal site in the marshes near Roosevelt Boulevard is the subject of a lawsuit filed by the City of Ocean City.center_img An engineering firm paid the City of Ocean City $130,000 to end a city lawsuit alleging the company failed to do its job, according to a document released this week.Duffield Associates Inc. — a firm based in Wilmington, Del., with an office in Cape May Court House — received a $194,634 contract in June 2011 to get permits and make construction plans for a site where material dredged from the bottom of lagoons and boating channels on Ocean City’s bay side was to be dumped.But a separate company claimed it could not complete a 2012 dredging project between 15th and 34th streets because plans for disposal were inaccurate and the site inadequate.With the settlement, Ocean City recovers two-thirds of the original contract cost for the design work.The settlement agreement, signed June 22 by a representative of Duffield Associates, includes “no admission of liability” from either party and covers neither party’s legal costs.As part of the confidential settlement, “the parties agree not to disclose, discuss or reveal terms of agreement.”“If asked, the parties will state only that ‘the matter has been resolved satisfactorily and the terms of the resolution are confidential,’ ” according to the agreement.Such nondisclosure terms are common in lawsuit settlements, but New Jersey courts have consistently upheld the public’s right to know in cases that involve public entities.OCNJ Daily received the settlement agreement through an Open Public Records Act (OPRA) request.The $194,634 contract for design work was just a small portion of the 2012 project cost. The city spent $1,829,655 for Hydro-Marine Construction Company of Hainesport, N.J., to remove 73,000 cubic yards of dredged material under a contract that called for the dredging of 106,000 cubic yards.The lawsuit and the settlement help illustrate the high stakes and high costs of Ocean City’s efforts to make its bayside waters navigable. Many areas are too shallow for boat traffic or even swimming through substantial portions of the tide cycle.It also shows that the city is willing to fight to hold contractors accountable for their work.last_img read more

qtapzqce

OCBP to Leave 11 Beaches Starting Today

first_imgOcean City Beach Patrol will end its protection of 11 beaches (including 46th Street, above) starting on Monday, Aug. 24. The Ocean City Department of Fire and Rescue Services announced this week that 11 beaches will not be guarded by the Ocean City Beach Patrol as of Monday, Aug. 24.With many students returning to classes before Labor Day (which falls on the latest possible date this year, Sept. 7), the OCBP does not have the manpower to fully staff  its beaches. The beach patrol offers incentive pay for guards to finish out the season through Labor Day, but that’s not a possibility for some high school and college students or teachers.The following beaches will not be protected for the week of Aug. 24 to 30:Waverly Blvd.Atlantic Blvd.13th Street16th Street (Surfing Beach)17th Street20th Street28th Street46th Street48th Street53rd Street60th StreetFire Chief Chris Breunig said there’s some possibility that additional beaches could left unguarded after Aug. 30.Thirty-one beaches remain protected 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. weekdays and 10 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. weekends and Labor Day. Guarded beaches include:Seaspray RoadSurf RoadNorth StreetStenton PlaceSt. Charles PlaceDelancey PlacePark PlaceBrighton Place5th Street7th Street8th Street9th Street10th Street11th Street12th Street14th Street15th Street18th Street22nd Street24th Street26th Street30th Street32nd Street34th Street36th Street39th Street42nd Street44th Street50th Street55th Street58th Streetlast_img read more

qtapzqce

Press release: The New Year’s Honours list 2019

first_img 12% of the successful candidates come from a BAME background; an MBE for Tariq Mahmood Dar, for his work with the community in Brent,London; 1018 candidates have been selected at BEM, MBE and OBE level: 358 atBEM, 422 at MBE and 238 at OBE; Supporting Children and Young PeopleAround 9% of honours are for work in education. The Honours Education Committeehas recommended a damehood for Professor Madeleine Atkins, the former CEOof the Higher Education Funding Council. Other senior awards in education include aCBE for Dr Margaret Wilson, Headteacher at the King John School, Essex; RuthMiskin, creator of the Read Write phonics programme. There is also an MBE forAndrai Zafirakou, Associate Deputy Head, Alperton Community School and 2018Global Teacher Prize winner.Economic ActivityIndustry and the economy make up 10% of this honours list. The EconomyCommittee has recommended Damehoods for Jayne-Anne Gadhia, ChiefExecutive Officer, Virgin Money, for services to financial services and women in thefinancial services; an OBE for Nicola Yates , Senior Vice President, EuropePharmaceuticals, GSK, for services to Women in Business and Workplace Equality;OBEs for entrepreneurs Tom Blomfield, the founder and CEO of Monzo; PaulLindley, Founder of Ella’s kitchen and an MBE for Amali De Alwis, CEO of CodeFirst Girls. 4% of the successful candidates consider themselves to have a disability(under the Equality Act 2010); The New Year Honours list 2019, published on Saturday 29 December, recognises the outstanding achievements of people across the United Kingdom.Awards include a damehood for model, actress and singer Lesley Lawson (aka Twiggy); a knighthood for record breaking cricketer Alastair Cook following his retirement from international cricket; a knighthood for award-winning author Philip Pullman, for services to literature; a knighthood for Dr Jeremy Farrar, Director of the Wellcome Trust; CBE for award winning actress Sophie Okonedo; a CBE for musician Nicola Benedetti; a CBE for children’s author Julia Donaldson; a CBE for journalist Chris Packham; an OBE for Tour de France winner Geraint Thomas; an MBE for Paralympic Head Coach Paula Dunn; and following England’s successful World Cup run in the Summer, an OBE for England Football manager Gareth Southgate; and an MBE for captain Harry Kane.This honours list continues to demonstrate the breadth of service given by people from all backgrounds from all across the UK.In total 1,148 people have received an award: 70% of the recipients are people who have undertaken outstanding work intheir communities either in a voluntary or paid capacity; and 5% of recipients identify as being LGBT.center_img This list highlights a range of extraordinary responses to a number of significant andtraumatic events – honouring those who have overcome personal loss, helpedrebuild communities and whose expertise and dedication showcase the very best ofthe UK.A total of 43 awards go to those involved in the response to the major terroristincidents of 2017, building on the gallantry awards announced in July. Awardsinclude an OBE for Paul Woodrow, Director of Operations at the LondonAmbulance Service; an OBE for Joy Ongcachuy, a theatre nurse at Barts Hospital;and a BEM for Theresa Lam, the Family Liaison Lead for Greater ManchesterPolice. There are a number of awards for police officers nominated following asignificant process undertaken jointly by the Greater Manchester, Metropolitan andCity of London Police Forces to identify the most exceptional contributions fromamong those already recognised with Queen’s Police Medals.In addition, an OBE goes to Mark Prince for tackling knife and gang crime inLondon; a BEM for 28 year old Stephen Addison, who set up boxing classes tochannel young people’s energy away from crime; and a BEM for Cheryl Johnson,who set up the charity Remember My Baby in response to personal loss.Civilian Gallantry ListThis list also coincides with the publication of 12 civilian gallantry awards, whichhave been awarded to those who have demonstrated exceptional bravery – puttingthemselves in danger to protect others.The George Medal has been awarded to Richard Stanton MBE and JohnVolanthen and the Queen’s Gallantry Medal goes to Christopher Jewell andJason Mallinson, for their remarkable efforts in the rescue of 12 junior footballersand their coach, trapped in a cave in Thailand.Seven firefighters from Hertfordshire Fire and Rescue Service also receive Queen’sGallantry Medals, for their exceptional bravery in rescuing elderly and vulnerableresidents from a serious fire in a 2017.The Queen’s Commendation for Bravery goes to 14-year-old Joe Rowlands, whosaved his father from drowning following a kayaking accident in February 2018.OverviewThe Prime Minister provided a strategic steer to the Main Honours Committee thatthe honours system should support children and young people to achieve theirpotential, enhance life opportunities, remove barriers to success and work to tacklediscrimination.WomenA number of prominent women are being recognised on the New Years Honours list,including a damehood for Professor Louise Robinson, Director of the NewcastleInstitute for Ageing, a damehood for Marianne Griffiths, CEO of the WesternSussex Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, and a CBE for Dr Helen Pankhurst, senioradviser at CARE International for services to gender and equality.Local CommunitiesIn total, 70% of awards in the New Year Honours list will go to people who haveundertaken outstanding work in or for their local community. Awards include: 544 women are recognised in the list, representing 47% of the total; an MBE for Denis Rogers, who has used his own past experience tobecome a role model for homeless people; a BEM for Catherine Watkins for her work in creating the award winningcharity Vale Parent Child Homework Support Club (VPC) in Rhoose, Vale ofGlamorgan. an MBE for David Morgan, for his tireless work with the Bedfordshire andCambridgeshire Rural Support Group; Read the full New Year Honours list and find out more about how to nominate someone for an award.last_img read more