Monthly Archives: December 2019

Cong, BJP seek discussion on poll violence

first_imgAs many incidents of violence were reported during the panchayat polls, legislators of the opposition Congress and the BJP demanded a discussion on the issue in the State Assembly on Thursday.As the opposition MLAs shouted slogans as soon as the House assembled on the second day of the budget session and demanded that the issue be discussed cancelling question hour, Speaker Niranjan Pujari adjourned the House proceedings.‘Unprecedented’ When the House reassembled, Leader of the Opposition Narasingha Mishra demanded that the Speaker allow a debate as violence in such large scale had never occurred in the State during rural polls in the past.The veteran Congress leader alleged that political activists of the opposition parties were attacked and killed. BJD Chief Whip Ananta Das said they were in favour of a debate on the issue.last_img read more

Maoist leader killed in Chhattisgarh

first_imgNAGPUR: The Chhattisgarh police claimed to have gunned down a Maoist during an encounter in Bijapur district in south Chhattisgarh on Sunday.“A police team led by police inspector Lakshman Kewat of Bhairamgarh (police station) set out at around 4 a.m. today based on some local inputs that a group of 10 to 15 Maoists is camping near the hills and forest around Surakheda village. At around 8.30 a.m., an exchange of fire took place near Surakheda village when the Maoists were crossing the area,” Mr.P. Sundar Raj the Deputy Inspector General of Police (DIG) of Dantewada range said in a statement.After the firing stopped, the body of one uniformed Maoist was recovered along with guns, a tiffin bomb, wires and detonators. The deceased was identified as Maoist leader Ratan Majji alias Hemla Ratan.last_img read more

Death toll in Bihar floods rises to 341

first_imgWith 37 more deaths, the toll in Bihar flood rose to 341 on Tuesday even as 1.46 crore people are affected by the deluge in 18 districts of the state.The flood toll stood at 304 till Monday in Bihar with 1.38 crore people battling the deluge in 18 districts. Around 7.61 lakh people have been shifted to safer areas. With water receding in some places many people have returned home.Prime Minister Narendra Modi would make an aerial survey of flood affected districts of Bihar on August 26, said Deputy Chief Minister Sushil Kumar Modi. “PM coming on 26th Aug for aerial survey of flood affected dists of Bihar (sic),” Sushil Modi said in a tweet.Special Secretary in state Disaster Management Department Anirudh Kumar said that 2.29 lakh people are putting up in 1,085 relief camps.Kumar said Araria district alone accounted for 75 deaths, followed by Sitamarhi (36), West Champaran (36), Katihar (26), Kisanganj (23), Madhubani (23), East Champaran (19), Darbhanga (19), Madhepura (19), Supual (15), Gopalganj (14), Purnea (9) Muzaffarpur (7), Khagaria (6), Saran (6) and Saharsa (4), Sheohar (4).Chief Minister Nitish Kumar reached Purnea by road from Patna after a helicopter in which he had to travel developed some snag and inspected some relief camps, an official accompanying him said from Purnea. The CM would stay in Purnea on Tuesday and would go to Araria, Katihar and Kisanganj on Wednesday, the official said.A total of 1,608 community kitchens are under operation in flood affected areas in which 4.52 lakh victims took meal on Tuesday, the state Disaster Management department report said. With flood creating havoc in as many as 18 districts of Bihar, the legislators have started contributing to the Chief Minister’s relief fund.Sushil Modi said he had made a request to the PM for a visit to Bihar during a meeting of chief ministers and deputy chief ministers of BJP-ruled states in Delhi on Monday. He said during the meeting all BJP-ruled states were asked to contribute to flood relief work in Bihar.He told reporters that all BJP Legislators would meet on Wednesday to decide to contribute their one month salary in flood relief. Former minister and JD(U) MLA Ranju Geeta donated her one month salary in the CM relief fund.A road construction department statement said a total of 203 state highways and other roads under it were damaged in flood waters in different places out of which 95 per cent have been repaired and made motorable. The Met office in its forecast said that Patna, Gaya, Bhagalpur and Purnea are likely to witness generally cloudy sky with the possibility of rain or thundershower on Wednesday.last_img read more

First phase of AURIC to be operational by year end: Devendra Fadnavis

first_imgAurangabad: The first smart industrial city under the Delhi-Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC) will become operational at Aurangabad by this year-end, and it would be a model for all such parks coming up in the country, Chief Minister Devendra Fadnavis said here.He was speaking at the ground breaking ceremony of the Bidkin section of the Aurangabad Industrial City (AURIC) project, one of the eight nodes of the ambitious DMIC project.“DMIC’s first industrial city will be operational by December 2018 and we are creating world class infrastructure here before inviting industries,” he said.AURIC is a greenfield smart industrial city being developed across nearly 7,900 acres as part of Shendra Bidkin Industrial Area. It is collectively a part of the Delhi Mumbai Industrial Corridor (DMIC).“As part of the DMIC, various smart industrial cities are being established in different states. However, the Shendra Bidkin Industrial Area is ahead of others in this corridor,” the Chief Minister said.While the State government has invested ₹3,000 crore in acquisition of land, the Centre government is contributing ₹8,000 crore for infrastructure development for the industry to plug in and play.About 35 small industries have been allotted land at Shendra and the biggest investor, with ₹4,000 crore, is Hyosung Corporation of South Korea which has taken up 100 acres to set up a textile chemicals manufacturing unit at Shendra.“In the first phase Hyosung will invest ₹1,200 crore to ₹1,500 crore. Besides, several ancillary units too will come along with it. We are happy with the progress. We are talking to more big industries to set up operations here,” Sunil Porwal, additional chief secretary, Industries, told The Hindu.He said over ₹60,000 crore investment will be made by the industry in both sections of AURIC which is expected to give direct employment to 30,000 to 40,000 people, which is the government’s main agenda. State government officials said AURIC implemented by Aurangabad Industrial Township Ltd which is a 49:51 joint venture between the DMIC Development Corporation and MIDC, is far ahead than other nodes in the country.last_img read more

AAIB to probe runway mishap at Shirdi airport

first_imgThe Aircraft Accident Investigation Bureau (AAIB) will be initiating a probe into the incident involving an Alliance Air aircraft, which ended up in the Runway Safety Area after overshooting the runway by 117 metres during landing at Shirdi airport on Monday.Forty-two passengers on board the flight from Mumbai to Shirdi were declared safe after the incident. Officials said a preliminary probe revealed that the aircraft, an ATR turbo-prop, had encountered strong tail winds during landing and had a long float before touching down. “After touchdown there was less runway available and the aircraft overshot before coming to a halt in the gravel,” an official said. Shirdi airport officials said that engineers of Air India arrived from Mumbai and retrieved the aircraft on Tuesday morning following which the airport was reopened to air traffic. The two pilots have been grounded pending investigation. An Alliance Air flight each from Mumbai and Hyderabad operated as usual on Tuesday. Built at an investment of around ₹350 crore, the airport at Shirdi has a 2,500-metre runway.last_img read more

NSCN-IM counters ‘genocide’ charge

first_imgThe Isak-Muivah faction of the National Socialist Council of Nagaland (NSCN-IM) has termed as baseless the “accusation” by the Kuki tribal group that it was responsible for ethnic cleansing in Manipur more than two decades ago.The Kuki-Naga conflict in the 1990s was “started by the Kukis”, the outfit said and reminded the Kukis that observing a black day on September 13 to mark the massacre of 115 people in Senapati district of Manipur in 1993 would never ensure harmonious coexistence but increase the animosity between the Nagas and the Kukis. “As a matter of fact, the Kukis started the Naga-Kuki conflict in 1992 which compelled the Nagas to form the Naga Lim Guard (NLG) for self-defence; otherwise, the marauding Kukis might have displaced more Naga villages and taken the lives of more innnocent Nagas,” the NSCN-IM said in a statement, asserting that the Kukis’ bid to capture the strategic Moreh (on Manipur-Myanmar border) was the root cause of the conflict.The NSCN-IM considers Moreh, a major border trade town, to be a part of the Khurmi region of Nagaland. “The Kukis invited the trouble and the Nagas were victimised instead,” the NSCN-IM said, denying any hand in the Naga-Kuki conflict during 1992-1997.“It was the NLG formed by the Naga villages which resisted the Kuki onslaught and aggression,” the NSCN-IM said. Both Nagas and Kukis suffered in terms of casualty with neither community claiming victory or defeat, it added.The Kukis claim the pogrom unleashed by the NSCN-IM killed more than 1,000 of their tribes people and displaced more than 1,00,000 people internally between 1992 and 1996.“The NSCN-IN is good in lying,” said S. Doungel, spokesperson of an apex Kuki group in Manipur.last_img read more

Patna HC issues notices to all ex-CMs of Bihar for allotment of govt. bungalows for life

first_imgTaking suo motu cognizance of the allotment of government bungalows for life, the Patna High Court on January 8 issued notices to all former Chief Ministers of Bihar.A division bench of Chief Justice A.P. Shah and Justice Anjana Mishra issued notices to the ex-CMs for being allotted government bungalows for life and asked why not these allotments be quashed.The next date of hearing is scheduled to February 11.Earlier, while rejecting the plea of Leader of Opposition in state assembly Tejaswi Yadav for retaining his official bungalow, 5 Deshratna Marg on January 7, the division bench of the Patna HC had said that they have taken “suo motu cognizance” of the government bungalows being allotted to former Chief Minister of the state for life too.Former Chief Ministers of the state Satish Kumar Singh, Dr. Jagannath Mishra, Jitan Ram Manjhi, Rabri Devi, Lalu Prasad Yadav (both live at one bungalow 10 Circular road) and Chief Minister Nitish Kumar too have been allotted huge government bungalows for life in Patna.Even after becoming the Chief Minister again Nitish Kumar retained the government bungalow 7, Circular road which was earlier allotted to him as ex-Chief Minister of the state. Crores of rupees were allegedly spent on renovating the bungalow for him.Later Mr. Kumar shifted to 1, Anne Marg, government bungalow, designated for Chief Minister of the state. As a Chief Minister, Mr. Kumar has also been allotted a palatial bungalow in Delhi too.last_img read more

Nishad Party switches to NDA camp

first_imgIn a fillip to the caste arithmetic of the BJP in Uttar Pradesh, the Nishad Party joined the NDA on Thursday, less than a week after it walked out of the Samajwadi Party-Bahujan Samaj Party alliance on March 29. Gorakhpur MP Praveen Nishad, who won the seat in a bypoll on an SP ticket in 2018 with BSP support, was also inducted into the BJP. He is the son of Sanjay Nishad, the founder and president of the Nishad Party.‘Natural alliance’Announcing the tie-up with the BJP in Delhi, Mr. Sanjay Nishad said it was a “natural alliance of Ram Raj and Nishadraj”. A caste icon and mythological ancestor of the Nishads, an OBC riverine community, Nishadraj is believed by Hindus to be the boatman who helped Lord Ram, his wife Sita and brother Lakshman cross the Ganga during exile.The Nishad Party chief said he hoped respect would be given to all people as part of the ‘Sabka Saath, Sabka Vikas’ agenda of the BJP and Prime Minister Narendra Modi, a dramatic shift in his political tone. Barely 10 days ago, he had resolved to mobilise the “85%” voters (OBC, Dalits and Muslims) against the BJP and had supported the SP and BSP to avoid division of votes.Altered equationsThe exit of the Nishad Party alters the caste balance in Purvanchal and parts of central U.P., where the BJP already enjoys support of the Kurmi-based Apna Dal and the Suheldev Bharatiya Samaj Party of Om Prakash Rajbhar. While Kurmis are a dominant agrarian OBC caste, Rajbhars and Nishads are categorised among the most backward castes.Stung by the exit of the Nishad Party, the SP on Saturday responded by replacing Mr. Praveen Nishad with another Nishad candidate from Gorakhpur — former Minister Ram Bhual Nishad. There is no announcement yet if the Gorakhpur MP will contest polls on a BJP ticket or defend his seat. BJP parliamentary board secretary J.P. Nadda, who inducted the Nishad Party into the NDA, said its support would have a big impact in east and central U.P.Reacting to the tie-up, SP president Akhilesh Yadav said it was a “ghate ka sauda” (loss-making deal) for the BJP. The people of Gorakhpur did not vote to ensure the victory of the MP alone but of the alliance that was behind him, he posted on social media, predicting that the Nishad Party boat was due to sink in the election.last_img read more

Electronic Smog Disorients European Robins

first_imgThe traffic reports on AM radio might help humans navigate, but the electromagnetic waves they travel on could have the opposite effect on birds. A 7-year investigation has discovered that radio waves disrupt the piloting systems of migratory European robins. The work, experts say, provides convincing evidence that such transmissions can alter animal behavior.For decades, people have feared that cellphones, power lines, and other sources of electromagnetic radiation might harm both human health and nature. But don’t fret. Your cellphones are still safe to use in the wild. “Modern-day charlatans will try to exploit this study to claim that cellphone radiation causes damage, but it’s not screwing up the robins,” says geobiologist Joseph Kirschvink of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, who was not involved in the study. “It’s telling them to use a different sense.”European robins, like many migratory birds, can navigate via Earth’s magnetic fields—but they don’t have to. Scientists have known for 30 years that robins’ magnetosense deactivates when it might lead them astray, for instance if they hit a spot where Earth’s geomagnetic field dramatically changes strength. Low-intensity radio waves now join this group of negative triggers.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)Biologists at the University of Oldenburg in Germany stumbled upon the phenomenon by accident in 2004 while they were testing a basic feature of European robin behavior. During the spring and autumn, the birds’ urge to travel is so strong that captured individuals will reflexively start jumping in the direction of their migration, even scratching up the bottom of their cages. But when the robins were held in wooden huts on campus, they were suddenly clueless as to which way they were supposed to be going.So the researchers started experimenting to see why the birds’ compasses appeared to have shut off. Change their food? No difference. Tweak their sleep cycles with artificial lighting? Nada. Finally, they started wondering if the magnetic fields produced by electronic devices on campus might be the culprit.To find out, the researchers installed aluminum wallpaper inside the birds’ wooden huts. The metal sidings were linked by means of wires to metal rods buried in the dirt outside. When electromagnetic noise struck the aluminum, it was soaked up and passed into the land. Known as “grounding,” this canceled out the electromagnetic noise coming through the huts’ walls, leaving a signal from only Earth’s magnetic field. After the screens were built, the robins aligned in the right direction, the team reports online today in Nature. But when the shields were switched off, the birds became disoriented again.Given the skepticism surrounding prior research into electromagnetic noise and animal habits, the project leaders used double-blind experiments to replicate the finding. Undergraduate and graduate volunteers ran the trials. Some worked in wooden huts with the shields turned on, while others had them off—but to eliminate bias, the students didn’t know who was working where.“We added a number of securities to protect ourselves from wishful thinking,” says neurosensory biologist Henrik Mouritsen of the University of Oldenburg, who led the study. “The conditions were repeated with different generations of students, and experiments were blinded on all levels.”Artificially reintroducing magnetic fields into a screened hut allowed the researchers to pinpoint possible sources of the misguiding noise. The most disorienting electromagnetic noise had frequencies matching those produced by AM radio stations and small devices like electronic article surveillance—those little magnetic tags for clothing at department stores. This is 1000 times less powerful than the frequencies emitted by cellphones and 400 times higher than those produced by power lines. Moving the birds to a rural location without electronic noise immediately restored their navigation skills.European migratory bird populations are declining. Though habitat destruction is the main suspect, the findings raise questions as to whether humanmade electromagnetic pollution from radio stations and home electronics is a general problem across Europe, or if this phenomenon is specific to Oldenburg.“I just wonder where this strong field originates,” says retired zoologist Roswitha Wiltschko, who co-discovered the avian magnetic compass with her husband Wolfgang in the 1970s and who was not involved in the work. “We were doing these experiments in the central district of Frankfurt, a major city, and we never had problems with magnetic fields disrupting the orientation of our birds.” Wiltschko feels the study is “really well done” but thinks more research is needed before claiming that this is a general occurrence.If it is, the effect should be short-ranged and limited to within 5 to 10 km of AM stations, says Kirschvink, who thinks that birds may have evolved this off switch for their magnetic compass long before Guglielmo Marconi invented the radio in order to combat radiation fluxes created by the sun’s activity.last_img read more

No Patent for Dolly the Cloned Sheep, Court Rules, Adding to Industry Jitters

first_imgDolly the sheep enjoyed a brief and highly publicized life as the first mammal cloned from an adult cell before succumbing to lung disease in 2003 at age 6. But an attempt to patent Dolly, and lay commercial claim to animals produced by cloning, survived much longer. But that nearly 10-year-long saga also appears to have ended last week when a U.S. federal appeals court ruled against giving a patent to Dolly’s creators. Although the ruling did not surprise patent experts, it is adding to the jitters that some biotech firms and patent attorneys are feeling over the broader fate of U.S. biomedical patents in the wake of recent court decisions.In 2009, the Roslin Institute of the University of Edinburgh, where Dolly’s creators Keith Campbell and Ian Wilmut made their discovery, received a U.S. patent on the method used to make her: somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). But they had also submitted a second claim on the product: Dolly herself, and any other cattle, sheep, pigs, and goats produced using SCNT. The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO) turned down that application, however, citing a federal law that restricts the subject matter of a patent to exclude “laws of nature, natural phenomena, and abstract ideas.”Roslin later appealed PTO’s rejection, but it was upheld by the Patent Trial and Appeal Board in February 2013. On 8 May, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit in Washington, which specializes in patent cases, agreed with that decision. Dolly and other cloned animals cannot be patented, a three-judge panel ruled, because they are identical to animals found in nature—namely, the animals whose DNA is used to make them. “Dolly’s genetic identity to her donor parent renders her unpatentable,” Judge Timothy Dyk wrote in the decision.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)“This seems like a pretty straightforward interpretation of the most recent Supreme Court cases, and I don’t find it terribly surprising,” says Robert Cook-Deegan, a genetics policy expert at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina. And it is in keeping with past decisions, he notes. Last year, the U.S. Supreme Court ruled—in the high-profile case Association for Molecular Pathology v. Myriad Genetics—that isolated sequences of human DNA are not patentable. And in a much older case, Diamond v. Chakrabarty in 1980, the high court established that a natural product could be patented only if it had “markedly different characteristics from any found in nature.”The Roslin Institute argued that Dolly and other clones did, in fact, differ in meaningful ways from the donor animals. Environmental influences on their appearance and behavior might make them unique, as would the mitochondrial DNA they carry, which comes from the egg cell donor, not the somatic cell donor. But such differences were not stated in the broad claims of Roslin’s patent application, the appeals court judges decided.The decision could have some short-run effects in the world of animal cloning, says Gregory Graff, an economist at Colorado State University, Fort Collins, who specializes in intellectual property for the life sciences. For example, the Food and Drug Administration is evaluating ways to use cloned animals in livestock, and the inability to patent such products could influence that industry, if it ever takes off.Alarming trend?Others, however, see the Roslin decision as evidence of a more alarming and wide-ranging trend. “The whole area of personalized medicine is going to get impacted by this sort of rationale,” says Carl Gulbrandsen, managing director of the Wisconsin Alumni Research Foundation in Madison, which works to commercialize academic discoveries.The fear, he says, is that if PTO is hostile to granting patents on humanmade products that are identical to products of nature, then investors might back away from promising areas of biomedical research. If similar logic were applied to patent applications on cells modified to resemble human stem cells, for example, or (maybe someday) lab-grown organs, such products might not receive patent protection, he tells ScienceInsider. Although inventors could still patent the methods used to create such products, Gulbrandsen says his own experience suggests “a product patent is much more valuable, and investors are much more comfortable with that than with a method of use” patent.These long-standing anxieties were amplified after this past Thursday’s ruling. “This storm front is about to become even more threatening. Take cover!” wrote patent attorney Warren Woessner in a response to the decision, published online on Friday in The National Law Review. Gene Quinn, a patent attorney and founder of intellectual property blog IPWatchdog, concluded a Dolly-themed post with the pronouncement, “Sadly, until further notice, personalized medicine is dead!”That anxiety is likely misplaced, Cook-Deegan says. “I don’t think [this case] is probably going to have a big echo effect,” he tells ScienceInsider. “I don’t think it has huge implications for other cases.” As for the Roslin Institute, he says its patent on the SCNT method has been enough to protect it from cloning competition. A product patent on Dolly herself would be useful only if the institute wanted to try to sue a company that managed to create cloned mammals by some other technique.Margo Bagley, a law professor at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville, also can’t relate to the “sky is falling” mentality. Roslin’s broad claim to a variety of cloned animals conflicts with long-standing Supreme Court precedent, she says, but a more narrow claim would have stood a better chance. And she predicts that innovations will still find their way to patent protection. “For a while now, people have been able to patent, in a sense, the low-hanging fruit,” she says. “The fruit may be little higher up on the tree, but the fruit is still definitely on the tree.”PTO guidelines draw fireBagley is, however, somewhat more concerned about a new set of guidelines for patent eligibility that PTO issued this past March in the wake of the Myriad case. The Dolly decision came down just as those guidelines were being discussed at a public hearing on Friday in Alexandria, Virginia. At the event, the agency took heat from patent attorneys who felt its interpretation of that decision was too broad. Hans Sauer, an intellectual property counsel for the Biotechnology Industry Organization called PTO’s approach “draconian,” claiming the new guidelines are leading patent examiners to reject applications in fields such as pharmaceutical composition, which are outside of the genetics and diagnostics applications discussed in the Myriad case.PTO officials say they’ll welcome input before finalizing the guidelines and encourage the public to submit written comments through the end of June.last_img read more

Mom’s environment during pregnancy can affect her grandchildren

first_imgStarving a pregnant mouse can cause changes in the sperm of her sons that apparently warp the health of her grandchildren, according to a new study. The finding offers some of the strongest evidence yet that a mother’s environment during pregnancy can alter the expression of DNA in ways that are passed on to future generations.A number of studies have suggested that environmental stresses in a parent may harm the health of subsequent generations. For example, women who were pregnant during a 1944 famine in the Netherlands known as the Dutch Hunger Winter had children and grandchildren who were unusually small or prone to diabetes and obesity. Animal studies have also found that a stress to a parent, such as exposing a pregnant mouse to toxic chemicals or mildly shocking a mouse father to make it fear an odor, can result in effects such as infertility or changes in behavior that persist for two generations or more yet can’t be explained by genetic mutations.Some scientists suspect that the effects are passed down via so-called epigenetic changes, chemical modifications of DNA that can turn genes on or off. A team led by geneticist Anne Ferguson-Smith of the University of Cambridge in the United Kingdom and diabetes researcher Mary-Elizabeth Patti of Harvard Medical School has now explored this idea by studying the DNA of two generations of mice descended from an undernourished mother.Sign up for our daily newsletterGet more great content like this delivered right to you!Country *AfghanistanAland IslandsAlbaniaAlgeriaAndorraAngolaAnguillaAntarcticaAntigua and BarbudaArgentinaArmeniaArubaAustraliaAustriaAzerbaijanBahamasBahrainBangladeshBarbadosBelarusBelgiumBelizeBeninBermudaBhutanBolivia, Plurinational State ofBonaire, Sint Eustatius and SabaBosnia and HerzegovinaBotswanaBouvet IslandBrazilBritish Indian Ocean TerritoryBrunei DarussalamBulgariaBurkina FasoBurundiCambodiaCameroonCanadaCape VerdeCayman IslandsCentral African RepublicChadChileChinaChristmas IslandCocos (Keeling) IslandsColombiaComorosCongoCongo, The Democratic Republic of theCook IslandsCosta RicaCote D’IvoireCroatiaCubaCuraçaoCyprusCzech RepublicDenmarkDjiboutiDominicaDominican RepublicEcuadorEgyptEl SalvadorEquatorial GuineaEritreaEstoniaEthiopiaFalkland Islands (Malvinas)Faroe IslandsFijiFinlandFranceFrench GuianaFrench PolynesiaFrench Southern TerritoriesGabonGambiaGeorgiaGermanyGhanaGibraltarGreeceGreenlandGrenadaGuadeloupeGuatemalaGuernseyGuineaGuinea-BissauGuyanaHaitiHeard Island and Mcdonald IslandsHoly See (Vatican City State)HondurasHong KongHungaryIcelandIndiaIndonesiaIran, Islamic Republic ofIraqIrelandIsle of ManIsraelItalyJamaicaJapanJerseyJordanKazakhstanKenyaKiribatiKorea, Democratic People’s Republic ofKorea, Republic ofKuwaitKyrgyzstanLao People’s Democratic RepublicLatviaLebanonLesothoLiberiaLibyan Arab JamahiriyaLiechtensteinLithuaniaLuxembourgMacaoMacedonia, The Former Yugoslav Republic ofMadagascarMalawiMalaysiaMaldivesMaliMaltaMartiniqueMauritaniaMauritiusMayotteMexicoMoldova, Republic ofMonacoMongoliaMontenegroMontserratMoroccoMozambiqueMyanmarNamibiaNauruNepalNetherlandsNew CaledoniaNew ZealandNicaraguaNigerNigeriaNiueNorfolk IslandNorwayOmanPakistanPalestinianPanamaPapua New GuineaParaguayPeruPhilippinesPitcairnPolandPortugalQatarReunionRomaniaRussian FederationRWANDASaint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da CunhaSaint Kitts and NevisSaint LuciaSaint Martin (French part)Saint Pierre and MiquelonSaint Vincent and the GrenadinesSamoaSan MarinoSao Tome and PrincipeSaudi ArabiaSenegalSerbiaSeychellesSierra LeoneSingaporeSint Maarten (Dutch part)SlovakiaSloveniaSolomon IslandsSomaliaSouth AfricaSouth Georgia and the South Sandwich IslandsSouth SudanSpainSri LankaSudanSurinameSvalbard and Jan MayenSwazilandSwedenSwitzerlandSyrian Arab RepublicTaiwanTajikistanTanzania, United Republic ofThailandTimor-LesteTogoTokelauTongaTrinidad and TobagoTunisiaTurkeyTurkmenistanTurks and Caicos IslandsTuvaluUgandaUkraineUnited Arab EmiratesUnited KingdomUnited StatesUruguayUzbekistanVanuatuVenezuela, Bolivarian Republic ofVietnamVirgin Islands, BritishWallis and FutunaWestern SaharaYemenZambiaZimbabweI also wish to receive emails from AAAS/Science and Science advertisers, including information on products, services and special offers which may include but are not limited to news, careers information & upcoming events.Required fields are included by an asterisk(*)The researchers gave pregnant mice chow containing only half the calories they needed during the last week of gestation—a time when the epigenetic patterns in a male embryo’s primordial sperm are erased, then reset. As Patti’s group had previously shown, this treatment resulted in offspring and grandchildren that were underweight and prone to diabetes.The group next examined DNA from the sperm of the males born to the starved moms. Compared with sons of control mice, their sperm had fewer chemical tags known as methyl groups on about 110 stretches of DNA. Often, the methyl groups were missing near genes involved in metabolism that may play a role in obesity and diabetes. The expression of these genes was also altered in some body tissues.However, although fetal tissues from the mother mouse’s grandchildren also had similar changes in gene expression, surprisingly, the DNA in these tissues did not carry these methylation differences. That suggests that the changes eventually disappear, the team reports online today in Science. Ferguson-Smith thinks methylation changes in the son’s sperm reflect the legacy of his undernutrition in the womb but, because they do not persist, would not directly explain the grandchildren’s disease. The methylation marks “are not the long-term memory that links one generation’s disease to the next,” she says.“This is a very nice study” linking ancestral exposures to epigenetic changes, “but I wouldn’t say the book is closed on how these things work,” says epigenetics researcher Oliver Rando of the University of Massachusetts Medical School in Worcester. To show that such methylation patterns cause the health effects seen in the male sons and their offspring, one needs to artificially turn off or on the suspect genes and show that this leads to the same result, he says. “Perturbing the epigenome is the big challenge for the field.”What’s more, the study does not rule out that the DNA methylation patterns are inherited for multiple generations because the researchers didn’t look for them in the sperm of the grandsons, Rando adds.Some are more skeptical. Columbia University geneticist Timothy Bestor has “a number of issues” with the study. Among them is that instead of studying inbred mice that were genetically identical, the researchers used a strain in which individual mice vary genetically. Although that may have made the mice more similar to the human population, it raises the possibility that in the womb, only fetal mice with a particular genetic makeup may have survived starvation. Because genetics also shapes methylation patterns, these genetic differences could be why their sperm DNA methylation patterns differed from those of control mice, Bestor says—not because malnutrition directly altered the patterns.last_img read more

Outsource’s In Source

first_imgMost people are likely tired of the interminable debate over outsourcing. But for me – a government employee fending off the protests of an enraged public – there is no escape.I work for the state of New Jersey, which has taken a serious hit from the mass outsourcing of American jobs.Irate citizens of our state complain to our governor and his appointed officials, sometimes admonishing them for policies that allow businesses to take operations abroad, and often imploring them to punish offenders by levying punitive taxes and other measures.My personal dilemma comes from the fact that I am Indian American. While it gives me joy to learn that my brethren in India are reaping the benefits of well-paying jobs and a newly-found source of income from outsourcing, it saddens me equally that my fellow Americans are paying a heavy price for it. The affected Americans include a large number of Indian American professionals as well, especially those in the information technology sector.I am frustrated by the term “outsourcing,” not just because it is the current buzz word in business circles, and not even because so many of my friends, relatives and acquaintances have been affected by it (both adversely and in rare cases favorably), but because I am caught in the outsourcing controversy in a rather unique way.My Indian side gets defensive when I hear derogatory comments about India stealing jobs from the United States. But as I watch the morale of workers here plummeting, my patriotic American side begins to bristle. The guilt as well as the indignation hover just beneath the surface of my skin, each emotion equally compelling. In one communication to the state, a woman complained that it was bad enough that Indians came here by the hordes and earned dollars, which they sent home to their families, but they’re now adding insult to injury by taking the jobs to India. With such liberal trade laws they don’t even have to travel to America anymore to exploit the country, she concluded.Every time another inflamed letter arrives in our offices the standard joke resurfaces: “It’s those damn Indians again.” I take the ribbing good-naturedly, because my coworkers are genuinely decent professionals; they treat me with respect and kindness and their comments are not directed at me. I attempt to explain that outsourcing boils down to simple economics: companies will find the cheapest labor and the best services for their investments. If not India, it is some other place on earth with the necessary talent and lower costs that these companies will seek and solicit.Occasionally, while I ride the elevator to my office, I overhear piqued comments about how India is robbing America blind. At this rate the country will become a land of paupers pandering to third world countries. “Some damn Indian chic pretending to be American with a fake name and phony accent tried to pull a fast one on me when I called for service,” one man remarked in disgust to his coworker recently.   I was the only Indian American in that crowded elevator and heard several supportive comments and observed a number of heads nodding in agreement with that sentiment. I was mortified. How could I respond to such comments? Getting on my soapbox to deliver a solemn lecture on the principles of economics and the pros and cons of global trade was not realistic. Quietly exiting the elevator at my floor was my only option.“Punish them,” “Hit the businesses where it hurts,” “Do something to stop the outflow of jobs,” are examples of sentiments I encounter frequently. I empathize with their authors, but I also know that punitive measures rarely work. Like the child that rebels against excessive discipline, chastisement can often backfire; instead of partial outsourcing, businesses may leave the state entirely and relocate to a more business-friendly state or country.Although I do not belong to the upper echelons of the government bureaucracy, a small number of these angry missives from the public trickle down to my desk for a suitable reaction. The letters require tactful, delicate, inoffensive, non-confrontational responses. My job is to draft replies that smooth the writers’ ruffled feathers and yet defend the administration’s stance on global trade and outsourcing. Not an easy job, considering the validity of some of the public’s concerns and the alarming statistics on outsourcing pumped forth every day. And certainly not a pleasant duty given the fact that it is India, my country of birth, that is under fire. Millions of angry Americans think outsourcing is a satanic term. India, because it is the current Mecca of information technology and call center outsourcing, is considered akin to an evil empire by dislocated workers, a not so enviable appellation that Russia bore in the 1980s. Naturally, by association, some of the animosity gets redirected toward us – Indian Americans.Japan experienced a similarly abhorrent reputation in the 1970s, when it challenged the American automobile and electronics industries. China and Korea, too, are currently on the receiving end of American hostility, but to a lesser degree than India, because it is mainly the manufacturing sector that has shifted there, an industry that has eroded gradually over the last 20 years.As I sit at my computer and compose the response letters, a multitude of thoughts and images flash through my mind. I envision a group of dapper Indians in India dining out or partying, or sending their children to better schools, all courtesy of an American company that provided them jobs. At the same time, I breathe a regretful sigh at the anguish, the desperation and the rage hreflected in the letters I hold in my hand. My fellow Americans, the people who accepted me and took me into their hearts, are hurting, and in turn that hurts me.But, as an optimist, I have immense faith in the American spirit of ingenuity and entrepreneurship, the capacity to rise to the occasion when necessary, the ability to heal and forge ahead, the belief in self-worth, and the need to discover and create. History proves that global commerce is good for the world. It is hard to predict where the next outsourcing destinations will be. The Middle East? South America? Africa?I have no doubt that America will regroup and rise up with fresh ideas to survive and flourish. In a society that fosters independent thinking and rewards innovation, ambition and free enterprise, the emergence of a better “mousetrap” is inevitable. The selling of that mousetrap to “those damn Indians,” who are making all that money, is predictable. Meanwhile, as a loyal American citizen as well as a staunch Indian, I try to do my part to keep the wheels turning. Related Itemslast_img read more

Foreign Exchange Violation Case Against Baba Ramdev

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Shujaat Bukhari remembered on first death anniversary

first_imgShujaat Bukhari killed in second attempt within 24 hours  “All his life my father was working for and raising awareness on the situation of Kashmir. He didn’t treat journalism as his job but adopted it as his lifestyle,” said Mr. Bukhari’s 16-year-old son, Tamheed Bukhari. Political leaders and members of civil society in Srinagar paid tributes to editor of Rising Kashmir Shujaat Bukhari on his first death anniversary on Friday. Dr. Tehmina Bukhari, wife of Bukhari, was joined by senior journalists, Siddharth Varadarajan of The Wire and Saeed Naqvi, to release a book — Kashmir’s Thin Red Lines — a compilation of the veteran journalist’s articles. Also Readlast_img read more

Radical Sikh outfit seeks U.S. intervention in Kashmir issue

first_imgEndorsing “right to self-determination of the Kashmiri people”, radical Sikh outfit Dal Khalsa has urged the U.S. to intervene to resolve the prolonged dispute with the help of the U.N. in the Security Council and tripartite mediation at the political level among India, Pakistan and the Kashmiris.In an open letter to U.S. President Donald Trump, the outfit has expressed concern regarding the political status of Kashmir and the resulting geopolitical situation in South Asia as a result of the Indo-Pak tensions.“We endorse the Kashmiri’s unequivocal right to self-determination and stand-in solidarity with them..Your [Mr. Trump] offer for mediation twice in the last two weeks attains significance as it is quite evident from the history of the last seven decades that India and Pakistan cannot resolve the issue bilaterally, it is time for the U.S. to lead the campaign for mediation as any delay can be disastrous,” wrote Harpal Singh Cheema, president, Dal Khalsa.Dal Khalsa along with the Simranjit Singh Mann-led Shiromani Akali Dal (Amritsar) had criticised the scrapping of Article 370, saying the move would further alienate the people of Kashmir and that peace would be a casualty.Dal Khalsa spokesperson Kanwar Pal Singh on Saturday said the outfit alongwith the SAD (Amritsar) and the United Akali Dal would stage protest in Punjab on August 15.“Our members will peacefully march across 15 districts to lodge our protest against injustices and political subjugation. Also, we will protest against the inconclusive probe into Bargari sacrilege cases of 2015 and the closure report filed by the CBI. The Punjab government’s decision of granting pardon to four police personnel, who were convicted of abduction and killing of a Sikh youth in 1993, is another issue that we will highlight,” said Mr. Kanwar Pal.last_img read more

Spurt in instant triple talaq cases in U.P.

first_imgWhen Nazreen, a resident of Lisadi Gate area of Meerut, filed a case against her husband Salman on August 2 for giving her instant triple talaq, she expected the police to arrest him.“It has been 17 days, and he is still at large. My guess is that he fled to Saudi Arabia where his father is working as a driver. He used to beat me, asked for dowry and on July 29, he gave me instant triple talaq over the phone,” Nazreen told The Hindu.The police registered an FIR under Section 498A of the Indian Penal Code, Sections 3 and 4 of Dowry Prohibition Act, 1961, but Nazreen said it didn’t meet her expectations from the law.Tanveer, brother of Bushra, who was given instant triple talaq by her husband Mohsin in Jaani area of Meerut, had similar expectations from the police. “There has been no movement in the case. I want to see him [Bushra’s husband] behind bars,” said Tanveer. Like Nazreen, Bushra also allegedly faced domestic violence and dowry demands.FIRs against husbandsIt has almost been three weeks since The Muslim Women (Protection of Rights on Marriage) Act, 2019 came into practice and Uttar Pradesh is seeing a spurt in cases where Muslim women are lodging FIRs to put their husbands behind bars for giving them instant triple talaq.According to an agency report, three dozen cases of instant triple talaq have been filed in the State since August 1, when the President put his seal on the Bill.In Hapur, a woman was allegedly given instant triple talaq on August 13 after she asked her husband to provide ₹30 to buy medicines. In Bareilly, Chand Bi was allegedly given instant triple talaq by her husband because she didn’t know how to cook. On August 9, three cases of instant triple talaq were registered in Bareilly in a day.In Etah, Aamir allegedly said talaq thrice to his wife Seema in the court of a Chief Judicial Magistrate where the two had gone for the hearing of a domestic violence case.Going by the number of cases, it seems, either the Act is not working as a deterrent, or women are filing complaints under sections of the new Act to add bite to already existing cases of domestic violence and dowry.Criminal proceedings Superintendent of Police (Rural), Meerut, Avinash Pandey said criminal proceedings have been started in the case that is under his domain. “There could be a perception that the FIR will lead to immediate arrest in such cases but the due investigation process needs to be followed. In Sections, which attract punishment of fewer than seven years, an immediate arrest is not necessary unless there is a threat to the life of the victim.”On the triple talaq law, he said it definitely has more teeth than Section 498A which asks for a period of mediation. “If used with the right intentions, it could be an empowering tool,” Mr. Pandey said.An anti-triple talaq crusader, who spoke on condition of anonymity, differed. “When we took the fight to the Supreme Court, we expected to get a fortified Act on the lines of the Hindu Marriage Act, 1955. What we have got at the end is a politically motivated legislation that seeks to put more Muslim men in jail.”Harvard-trained lawyer and gender activist Nazia Izuddin said, “The triple talaq law, if aimed at reformation, must be able to empower lawyers to get monetary relief/alimony, custody of children and safety and protection of the life of the woman and children. In its current form, the law doesn’t provide these remedies or restitution of marital rights to the woman.”last_img read more

Punjab to canalise rivers with help from World Bank, ADB

first_imgWith Punjab facing the flood fury, the Amarinder Singh government has decided to canalise all rivers in the State, taking technical support from the World Bank and the Asian Development Bank. The Chief Minister, who on Thursday conducted an aerial survey to assess the damage caused by floods in Sultanpur Lodhi (Kapurthala) and Jalandhar areas, announced a project to realign river streams and courses, besides strengthening and widening of river embankments for a permanent solution to the problem of floods.In Sarupwal of Sultanpur Lodhi, where the overflowing Sutlej led to a breach in the embankment, affecting 62 villages, the Chief Minister promised due compensation to the affected farmers as soon as the water receded and a special ‘girdawari’ (crop loss assessment) was completed.He also announced dedicated relief teams in the affected areas. Each team will comprise officials from the health, civil supplies and animal husbandry departments and ensure regular and timely supply of food, medicines and fodder.CM inspects breachCapt. Amarinder also inspected the breach at Gidderpindi in Jalandhar, resulting from the release of excess water from the Bhakra dam. For the first time, the Bhakra, which is normally filled to its permissible storage level of 1,680 feet by September, was overflowing in August, he said. The Chief Minister told reporters that even if the central government fails to extend support, the State would ensure full support to every person affected by the floods. Letter to PM The Chief Minister had written to the Prime Minister on Tuesday, seeking a special flood relief package for the State.Meanwhile, Capt. Amarinder was briefed about the current situation arising out of the Satluj breach by the Deputy Commissioners of Jalandhar and Kapurthala. They informed him that more than 18,000 packets of dry ration besides water bottles were airdropped on Wednesday in all the affected villages with the help from Army and NDRF. Another 5,000 food packets and water would be distributed on Thursday. (With PTI inputs)last_img read more

It’s Paswan kin versus Cong. veteran in Samastipur

first_imgThe National Democratic Alliance candidate Prince Raj of the Lok Janshakti Party is in a direct contest with mahagathbandhan nominee Ashok Kumar of the Congress for the Samastipur (reserved) Lok Sabha seat for which bypoll is scheduled to be held on October 21.The by-election was necessitated after the sudden demise of the sitting MP Ramchandra Paswan, father of Prince Raj. Ramchandra Paswan who had defeated Ashok Kumar in the last Parliamentary election, was the younger brother of LJP chief Ram Vilas Paswan.While Prince Raj is making his electoral debut on an emotional pitch, Ashok Kumar, Congress MLA from Rosera (reserved) Assembly constituency, is appealing to the people to vote for him to raise their voice in Parliament. Joint campaigningOn Thursday, all three top Bihar NDA leaders — Chief Minister Nitish Kumar, LJP chief Ram Vilas Paswan and Deputy Chief Minister Sushil Kumar Modi — campaigned together for Prince Raj and addressed a public meeting in Samastipur. The NDA leaders appealed to the people to vote for young Prince Raj for the development of the constituency. There are a total of eight candidates in the fray for the bypoll. Before delimitation the Samastipur seat was known as Rosera (reserved) Lok Sabha seat.In the 2019 election, Ramchandra Paswan had defeated Ashok Kumar by over 2.5 lakh votes. Along with the Samastipur Lok Sabha bypoll, five Assembly constituencies — Nathanagar, Simri Bakhtiyarpur, Darounda, Belhar and Kishanganj — will also go to poll on October 21 as the sitting MLAs had won in the Lok Sabha election.last_img read more